Ask the Doc! The battle of information and experts

Lifestyle
ask the doc, virus, information

Going around the nation in photos and articles, BKP highlights the first day back to school with some of the issues and struggles that people are seeing. From packed hallways to sports cancellations, these are merely the effects of virus’ continuation.

The first step to returning to school is staying up to date on information. Your state’s Department of Public Health has that information in whatever form they are reporting in. But for families with students, whether you’re getting on a bus today, or getting on your laptop for school at home. Maintaining awareness and an informed study of your state’s situation will keep you up to date with the Docs, and up to date on your own choices in the coming days.

BKP starts our discussions off with comparisons of the available information from recent days as well as a comparison of age groups showing a vast increase of younger people (age 18-29). These people could be those ignoring guidelines and social distancing. But they also show one of the lower hospitalizations counts of all people over 18-years-old. They also have the lowest death rate of those groups.

Dr. William Whaley clarifies further saying there isn’t a lot of sick people there, just a lot of positive tests. A very important clarification as Dr. Whaley explains that study isolating people for 21 days with positive tests. That test showed 30 percent of those positive cases never showing a single symptom. The viral load of that 30 percent is just as high as those who do get sick. The contagion is still there and still spreading. Along with this point, Dr. Raymond Tidman offers another note saying a lot of our decision making points are not considering this as well.

The Doctors also look at the treatment guidelines and how much has change since March of 2020. Is the medical community really looking at Hydroxychloroquine and it’s uses? Who should be taking it? When is it viable? Who is approving the drug? These questions all surround these treatment guidelines. Who is supposed to tell you what is effective? Dr. Whaley talks about the steps of drug studies and the misinformation that gets people sidetracked or panicked?

Dr. Tidman agrees that it is difficult to filter these things and work towards a common understanding. People are so inundated with information, technology, sources, and videos. Dr. Tidman says to focus on results and what you know. Don’t let the internet and the vast amounts of information and misinformation jerk you around.

Looking through previous episodes, we talk about some of the predictions that came true in sports with games being cancelled and positive cases rising. Players are following old habits and not maintaining the new rules. Major League Baseball has already warned teams that failure to follow the new rules will see teams suspended for the season. Additionally, more and more players are opting out of their sports this year to avoid the risk. The NFL opt out saw 66 player saying they won’t play this year. According to Dr. Whaley, many of those players were the higher risk players, front lineman and high contact positions.

The changing game is a mirror of our society, according to Whaley. Just like the games, societal behavior will change as he suspects the virus will “smolder” in a form of presence for years. Not enough to be a pandemic, but enough to continue changing your behavior.

Because of that, Dr. Tidman counters with a point of saying that people don’t live like they are in a hospital. He points out that physicians tell people things that work and those that don’t. They can help people with finding acts that are troublesome and things that can help them. A doctor can put a patient in a controlled environment, teach them about an illness, show them how to eat and live and move, but people don’t live in controlled environments.

In that same way, there are many people saying exactly what to do and how to do it in the face of the virus. Verging on tyranny, people will not follow everything they are told to do. However, Dr. Tidman says that educating people and informing them on all the details and mitigation steps that will allow them to live their lives and live with the consequences of their lives.

Shifting topics, one decisions that some are wishing they could do is get the virus at home with the family and immunize to it naturally so that they can move on as normal. An idea rooted in the desire to just get past the issue after 5-6 months of this virus.

Circling back to the beginning thoughts, the question of viability in that idea is the same question of public health attempting to isolate and quarantine positive cases. The difference between being positive and being sick is pushing authorities on how to carry on normally.

Dr. Tidman also points all the way back to two cruise ships full of people. One of those ships got masks and used them to slow the spread. Dr. Tidman noted that even if they got infected, some of those people using masks got lower doses of the virus and became asymptomatic as their bodies were better and more quickly able to respond and build immunity to it. The “viral load,” as Dr. Whaley calls it, is important in those cases. That said, Dr. Tidman notes that some people need to avoid the virus. Higher risk people are higher risk because the could die from the virus. Those risks are too high.

The questions of need, risk, immunity, life, mitigation, and exposure all need to go through experts. Doctors who have seen the virus. But, ultimately, we as people make our own decisions. We choose what we do and how we respond. We grow in our lives through those decisions. The best we can do is find those experts who have the best information and avoid the misguidance that is overabundant.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

Ask The Doc! Killing The Fake News

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

How do you do what you want amid the virus? Dr. William Whaley talks everything from sports to travel for citizens and maintaining your responsibility.

First up is the masks. Dr. Whaley speaks to the efficacy of mask usage. He talks about using goggles and the suggestions of who should wear them. Face shields, masks, goggles and other protective equipment are exactly what doctors wore for AIDS, Hepatitis, and many other diseases to prevent splatter. Sure, goggles do lower chance to contract the Coronavirus by a small percentage and medical professionals need to wear these things.

BKP and Dr. Whaley make the analogy that in baseball, if someone cannot play, you can always call up a player from the minors or find a replacement, but healthcare professionals don’t have reserves of “players” waiting to be called up.

Dr. Ray Tidman speaks on the subject, too, as he points out that Dr. Whaley wouldn’t wear the shield and mask in the back office as he works, but does wear it in the hallways and with patients. He says, “I want to bring it out to clarify it to the public. I keep trying to emphasize that you need to wear the right mask at the right time and in the right place.”

Taking responsibility and knowing these times is part of the day. Dr. Tidman says to stop shaming and pointing fingers, but also wear the right gear when you need to.

Taking news is important in our age, but the Doctors warn you against some of the outlandish claims of media and certain tv and news doctors. Focusing on the information available is another responsibility in fighting the virus.

Dr. Whaley also speaks on the sports side and how athletes react to playing against empty stadiums as well as treatment for players. Players under contract play the game, but as soon as the player contracts the virus. He is a patient says Dr. Whaley. They have Doctors and the team should stay out of the care. It isn’t about the team and the game at that point. It’s about certainty and nobody knows if it is safe to play and work out at the high level of activity or how soon they should.

He compares the bubbles in NBA and NHL use as they play. The drastic difference in those play styles has shown to be efficient.

Both Doctors agree that it shouldn’t be an authority decision, but rather a group decision of those involved.

This also translates down to new rules, changes in operations and style in high school sports, specifically football right now.

Dr. Tidman also brings up the idea of rule-making amid the fear and reactionary process. This is where he says that the smaller groups of people could come together and make better policies and rules than far off authoritarians handing down those rules. In this way, they can see the information and consensus rather than responding to fear. The fear only causes overreactions and bad situations.

Moving away from the shame and fear is the final thought of Tidman as he points to us, as humans, figuring things out together instead of separating.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

 

Ask The Doc! The good progress in combating the virus

Lifestyle
ask the doc, virus, information

Ask the Doc takes a look at the opposite side of the line in combating the virus as so many are focusing on the negative.

Dr. William Whaley returns again this week to answer questions of those asking what, if anything, are we doing right about the fight against COVID-19. As always, the tie plays a role. This time, Dr. Whaley wears a tie with balls on it as he speaks to a recurring metaphor he uses.

Handling the virus is like juggling balls in the air as an assistant continually adds one more ball after one more ball.

Making progress against the virus and understanding each stage better has helped to stop adding balls to the juggling and is looking to start removing some of these”factors” and “complications” that can overwhelm a patient.

The next step in combating the virus and the overwhelming, as BKP says, is getting out the information for people to see the progress. BKP walks you through the Department of Public Health Website as Dr. Whaley explains some of the numbers and population comparisons.

With more information, we know a lot more about treatment, we know a lot more about the virus. Dr. Whaley talks about reacting to and treating to turn Cytokine Storms into healthy lungs.

According to the National Cancer Institute, a Cytokine Storm is “a severe immune reaction in which the body releases too many cytokines into the blood too quickly. Cytokines play an important role in normal immune responses, but having a large amount of them released in the body all at once can be harmful. A cytokine storm can occur as a result of an infection, autoimmune condition, or other disease. It may also occur after treatment with some types of immunotherapy. Signs and symptoms include high fever, inflammation (redness and swelling), and severe fatigue and nausea. Sometimes, a cytokine storm may be severe or life threatening and lead to multiple organ failure. Also called hypercytokinemia.”

Cytokine Storm Syndrome is the real threat of the virus as you are “juggling” issues. The syndrome is that major ball that causes everything to fall. Dr. Whaley explains how understanding the coagulation effects and counter the major issues of the syndrome can crater fatality rates.

Thanks to these steps and continuing efforts, Dr. Whaley says that we are lowering the fatality rates of those hospitalized. It is also lowering the number of people that a single positive person infects. He explains that getting an average rate of this below one person is how you can decrease, slow, and kill the disease. He points to efforts like masks and social distancing as just one part of the steps to lower that average.

We also reach into hospitalizations and how admissions aren’t coming from COVID-19 immediately. Dr. Whaley says that you might get tested, but a person has to be sick to be admitted into a hospital. Testing procedures are improving and the hospital admissions come from positive tests.

Along with vaccines possibilities, drugs, treatments, and improvements in our medical response have dropped Atlanta’s mortality rate of hospitalizations in large systems is at 5%. Two months ago that rate was 20%.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

Ask the Doc! The Science and Secondary Effects of Covid-19

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

With major spikes in numbers, Ask the Doc! talks about the daily science of treatment of the virus while translating and bringing the science of the virus to you.

Dr. William Whaley’s tie leads into a conversation about the international scope of the virus while comparing medical safety in countries. Which data is viable and what statistics are out of proportion? A 100% increase in deaths could mean going from 1 to 2. Whaley says to focus on people getting sick. So, what do you do about it?

Dr. Whaley also touches on lockdowns and shutdowns have on the spread of the virus as he compares case rates before shutdown and those after shutdowns in 149 countries. But also compares mask usage with a story about two hair stylists in Missouri. With positive tests on these two stylists after having served 139 clients and contact with 6 coworkers. Dr. Whaley said not one of those people tested positive.

Dr. Tidman speaks to schools reopening and the panic onset. Overreactions are hurting our country and people are not calmly assessing the situation. Returning to schools and providing safety for students is possible with scientists and doctors supporting the thought.

But taking into account a student and family together, BKP turns the conversation to sports seasons. Tidman responds with the muddled message of masks in the country. Which mask is the mask people need and who needs them? The Docs go deeper into masks and needs within the community.

As we continue figuring things out amid the virus, Dr. Tidman talks about the learning process and the requirement of discipline. Discipline is the second half of the freedom we own as we must take responsibility as we move into school, into Fall, and into the next steps of recovery.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

 

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

Students return to school August 7th : What to expect

Lifestyle

Blue Ridge, Ga. – Students of the Fannin County School System (FCSS) will have the option of returning to school in a modified traditional setting or utilizing online learning for the 2020-21 school year.

School Administration released their plans for reopening schools at the Board of Education (BOE) regular July meeting.

Assistant Superintendent Sarah Rigdon gave the board an overview of what to expect when school comes back into session. 

Fannin County, School System, Board of Education, Reopening, First Day, School Year, 2020, 2021, 2020-21, Covid-19, Coronavirus, Department of Education, Georgia, Online Learning, Traditional, Superintendent, Michael Gwatney, Sarah Rigdon, Masks, Safety

Rigdon presented the BOE with administration’s plan to reopen schools.

The Georgia Department of Education (DOE) released guidelines in early June for schools to consider when reopening in the State of Georgia. These guidelines, however, were only recommendations and the ultimate decisions for school operations were left up to the districts.

The DOE guidelines, along with guidance from both local and state authorities, as well as guardian and faculty input helped shape the approach that the FCSS is choosing to implement for the time being.

“The important part for us was to get the information and make the best decisions that we can,” Fannin County School Superintendent Dr. Michael Gwatney spoke of the system’s plan. “This plan is subject to change. We need to think of this as a living document. It will be modified as new things are learned.”

 

***Important Dates***

Traditional school, or in person education will begin on August 7, 2020.

Faculty and Staff are to report on August 3, 2020.

Online Learning will also begin on August 7, 2020.

Parents and Guardians may enroll their child for Online Learning between July 10 – July 20, 2020.

 

***Online Learning***

For those not comfortable with the traditional in class setting, an online option will be available. Assistant Superintendent Rigdon stressed that this online option will not mirror the distance learning that the school put in place upon the mandatory closure earlier this year.

The online learning platform will be run through a 3rd party that is yet to be determined. The platform will provide instruction to the child with the parent or guardian being a “learning coach”.

Students enrolled in online learning will spend the majority of the traditional school day (8:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.) either working online or working to complete assignments given online. Attendance will be taken and monitored via login and assignments completed.

There will be FCSS personnel assigned to check on each child’s progress. The “learning coaches” will be given the name of someone at the school who can help them navigate the program or assist with issues.

The content of the online learning platform, according to FCSS, will be “rigorous and graded”.

Students enrolled in Online Learning will be able to participate in sports and extracurricular activities. 

While the FCSS is not requiring that students sign a contract to remain in the online platform once enrolled (many other districts have this requirement), they would like to see those enrolled stay with the program through the first semester or for the entirety of the school year.

“We are not asking parents to sign a commitment, but we do want them to be extremely thoughtful as they make that decision because it is going to require us to allocate and spend funds that could be better spent if they’re not going to stick with the program,” Rigdon explained of the need for students and guardians to consider the decision heavily.

Rigdon did add for those who enroll but discover that the online platform is not working for them, “We are never turning a child away from our schools.”

Students utilizing the Online Learning platform will complete assignments from a school issued device. FCSS will provide a WiFi hotspot for students without internet, but these hotspots work much like mobile phones, so if you are an area with poor cell phone service it is likely that the hotspot would not work for you.

Online Learning is available for children in grades Kindergarten – 12. This includes children with IEPs (Individualized Educational Program). Online Learning is not available for Pre-K students.

 

***Traditional School***

Masks are optional for both students and personnel. Parents or Guardians must provide a mask for students who wish to wear one throughout the day.

Temperatures will be taken for all students, staff, parents and guardians each morning upon arriving at the campus. Anyone with a temperature of 100 degrees Fahrenheit or higher will not be permitted to stay at school. 

Hand sanitizer will be available to all children and adults before entering the school buildings.

Fannin County, School System, Board of Education, Reopening, First Day, School Year, 2020, 2021, 2020-21, Covid-19, Coronavirus, Department of Education, Georgia, Online Learning, Traditional, Superintendent, Michael Gwatney, Sarah Rigdon, Masks, Safety

Parents, Guardians, and Staff completed a survey on key issues. This helped shape the district’s plan to reopen.

Elementary teachers will move the students instead of students changing classes. Middle and High School students will not be allowed to congregate in hallways. When and where possible class changes for Middle and High School students will be staggered or hallway traffic patterns will be addressed to prevent overcrowding.

When possible students will be assigned seats and will keep the same seat during the instructional class period.

Each school will “develop school level procedures” to limit the number of students in the cafeteria. This may include “grab and go” where students will pick up meals and eat in a classroom or designated area.

The final plan for buses has not been finalized. However, hand sanitizer will be available for anyone upon boarding a bus. Buses will be sanitized daily and ventilated to the extent feasible when in route.

Parents and guardians will be notified of any adjustments to bus routes or pick up times before the first day of school. Requirement to wear a mask while on a bus has not been decided, but parents and guardians will be notified of this decision as well.

Parents and guardians will be allowed to walk their child to class during the first few days of school but must wear a mask.  Schools will determine when parents and guardians will no longer have access beyond the main entrance.  

FCSS states “We want to keep the lines of communication strong, but we need to limit the number of people flowing into and out of the buildings each day.”

 

***If Schools Close Again***

Those students enrolled in Online Learning would continue the course that they are taking with no change. Students of the traditional classroom setting would switch to online learning but follow a model similar to that that was implemented in March 2020.

 

The FCSS states of the opening plan that “plans may change based on future orders from the Governor, the Department of Community Health, or the Department of Education”.

“Our desire is always to operate a traditional school with face to face,” Rigdon said of the hope for all students eventually to return to a traditional setting, “We believe our instruction is best at that level.”

Author

Natalie Kissel

Natalie@FetchYourNews.com

Ask The Doc! Confused Facts

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

Walking you through the Coronavirus updates with the Department of Public Health, North Georgia’s surge, and the public’s concerns. With more cases daily, Dr. William Whaley and Dr. Ray Tidman speak with BKP on the virus and testing with Georgians from a medical standpoint and how we need to be looking at longer stretches of time with tests instead of singular days. We look at the graphs with statistical analysis of cases in Georgia with Dr. Whaley. However, Dr. Tidman counters with comparisons of urban Atlanta versus a more rural North Georgia while touching on Gilmer’s recent positive test in the courts.

Additionally, we breach the discussions of schools and education amid the virus. With the resurgence of the virus, is “home learning” really the best idea? Topics like wearing masks in schools and the precautions that schools are taking become part of the discussion as the compare schools allowing families who choose “home learning” while having others in school and others with less restrictions. Dr. Whaley says the decisions fall with the families instead of the school administrators.

Ultimately, we talk about the responsibility involved in the virus. Individual responsibilities reiterates what the Doctors have been saying. Protect yourself, don’t rely on others for your protection and the responsibility of your health.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

 

Ask The Doc! Vaccines and a Second Wave

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ask the doc

BKP is joined by Dr. William Whaley and Dr. Raymond Tidman to discuss the concept of vaccines. Dr. Whaley says a vaccine wouldn’t be available until late December. They also discuss a second wave.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask The Doc! High Risk Group Clusters

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

This morning Dr. William Whaley and Dr. Tidman discuss the most unanswered questions revolving around Covid-19. Can the kids go back to school? Is it safe? Will there be a spike in cases? Will there be a vaccine?

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask the Doc! Changing the goal posts and what to believe

Lifestyle
ask the doc, virus, information

Special Host Rick speaks with Dr. William Whaley about the CDC, Masks, and what goals we’re still trying to reach to reopen and reconnect amid the virus. Should we be wearing them? Will there be a vaccine? What about the surfaces? The doctor ansers viral questions about what you should know and prepare with for the outbreak.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask The Doc! Clearing The Air

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

This morning, Dr. William Whaley and Raymond Tidman clear the air of the false Covid-19 information floating around. They discuss antibodies, how to protect yourself and others, and hotbeds for the virus.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask the Doc! Surface Time

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ask the doc, Surface time

Is there such a thing as surface time for COVID-19? If so, is there a cure for it other than chemicals? BKP asks Dr. Whaley and Dr. Tidman. Their answer is sunlight. Does this mean that the summer months could be the cure-all?

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask the Doc! What are the odds?

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Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

On Ask the Doc this week, Dr. Ray Tidman and Dr. William Whaley discuss the odds for non-high-risk people’s chance of receiving the virus. Also is there a possibility of going to back to our normal lives as we knew them? or will there be a new normal?

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Colorful face masks protect healthcare professionals from coronavirus

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BLUE RIDGE, Ga – Healthcare workers serve as the frontline of defense against COVID-19, and many work without proper protection due to supply shortages. Several professional and amateur seamstresses across the nation have answered the call to create cloth face masks for healthcare workers and those in need.

One such individual resides in Blue Ridge, Ga, Tina Rice of Tina’s Tie-Dye Store. Rice essentially turned her office into a production line to sew as many free face masks as possible for nurses, doctors, first responders, elderly, and high-risk individuals.

As of April 9, 601 tie-dye masks have shipped from her production room, and hundreds more still to be made.

When asked why sew face masks, she said, “My daughter, niece, and nephew are nurses, and they were telling me about the supply shortages in hospitals… I thought I can make masks.”

And so, she began on this journey of giving back at a time when the country needs it. Rice posted her sewing availability on Facebook, and it started to snowball from there. She has made face masks predominately for people she knows or customers, but new individuals have asked for her creations as well. Her masks go all over the country.

Rice ships masks all over the country.

As far as the tie-dye element, Rice said this about her business, “I loved color, and I grew up in San Francisco. I started in 1973 and fell in love with the process. It’s something I could do with four small kids at home.”

Her love of color and helping others, not only protects nurses, doctors, and first responders but brings joy to those stuck inside hospitals or nursing homes.

Sewing for 10 hours a day, Rice likes to make her tie-dye masks in batches of 6 to 12 to keep the process flowing. From start to finish, it takes her around 25 minutes to create the final product. The sewing portion requires about 10 minutes of the process. Rice’s husband also helps out to keep production moving along.

Thus far, Rice has received “lots and lots and lots of thanks and pictures” from nurses. In her conversations with healthcare workers, Rice relayed that some of them only have her mask as protection against airborne infection.

One nurse wrote on Tina’s Tie Dye Facebook page, “Thank you so much for caring and taking the time to make this beautiful tie-dye mask for me. It’s greatly appreciated!”

Cloth face masks don’t prevent the majority of particles from reaching the face like N-95 respirators or surgical masks, but estimates report the fabric is 50 percent effective.

Her face mask pattern comes from Deaconness Hospital, and she said that many sewers across the country have based their designs on this one. The design doesn’t include the filtration pocket. Some of her mask recipients have expressed concern over the glass in the filters.

Place masks in a garment bag can extend its life.

However, she will take requests for alterations to designs and keeps other templates on hand.

The masks include two separate pieces of fabric on the inside Rice uses a tightly woven flannel so it’s softer against the skin and the outside is a tightly woven cotton.

She adds the ears have been a case of trial and error to find the best fit for those wearing masks for extended amounts of time. She started with elastic, but then nurses provided feedback that they would rather have ties for comfort. Now, she uses cut-up knit shirts, which roll and are soft around the ears.

Additionally, Rice tweaks the design, so it fits over a variety of face sizes, both male and female.

According to the CDC, cloth face masks limit public exposure to COVID-19 by wearing them in public places where it’s difficult to maintain six feet of distance – such as grocery stores and pharmacies. However, everyone should still maintain the CDC and Federal guidelines to slow the spread.

Recently, Rice started taking a couple of masks with her to grocery stores and offering them to the elderly and employees. She’s received mixed responses from shoppers and employees. Some are grateful, but others decline her offer.

Masks need to fit securely over the nose and mouth. Wearers should also wash it whenever returning home from a trip into the community. Also, children under two should not wear a mask as it might inhibit their ability to breathe normally.

The CDC asks the public to ensure the mask:

  • fit snugly but comfortably against the side of the face
  • be secured with ties or ear loops
  • include multiple layers of fabric
  • allow for breathing without restriction
  • be able to be laundered and machine dried without damage or change to the shape

Those interested can donate to Rice’s cause online. She has accepted some “very generous” donations from individuals in the community and “doesn’t expect to evert charge people for [her masks.]”

Individuals can order online ordering for masks or any of Tina’s Tie-Dye products.

As for her hope for the community, once the pandemic ends, Rice stated, “I hope that people look around and see the beauty of humanity.”

She is just one of the thousands tirelessly working to protect as many people as possible using their unique talents. In a world where many people believe they are more divided than ever, perhaps the silver lining of this crisis is discovering that comradery many people had lost.

Rice wearing one of her creations.

We live in a great county with good people,” affirmed Rice, and she’s right. Whether it’s through colorful face masks, food delivery to children in need and the elderly, or just calling to check on the neighbor down the street, American’s are demonstrating every day the best this county has to offer.

Ask the Doc! Flattening The Curve

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BKP asks Dr. William Whaley and Dr. Steven Marlow their prediction on this virus. They mentioned how you can slightly see with the prosecutions put out how the curve is flattening. It is very important, they state, that we continue doing those thing, such as sanitizing our hands, wearing masks and social distancing to continue with this curve flattening.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask the Doc! Asymptomatic Transmitting

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Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

This week’s episode of Ask the Doc! has Dr. William Whaley and Dr. Steven Marlow dive into the COVID-19 virus with BKP. They discuss about how a person can have no symptoms and still be a carrier. They also answer the questions on if being a diabetic can make you more open to get this disease and if it matters if you have a preexisting health issue or not?

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Feed Union County 2020 initiative kicked off on Monday

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Feed Union County 2020

BLAIRSVILLE, Ga – While many are adjusting to staying home, healthcare workers are working overtime to help keep everyone in the community safe. To show their appreciation, several organizations came together to form the Feed Union County 2020 initiative for those caring for the sick in Union County and for individuals in need.

The first soup drive was held on Monday, March 30 from 11:30 a.m. until the food ran out at Nani’s Restaurant. Marife Arrazcaeta, the owner of Nani’s, said she intends to continue the soup drive every Monday for individuals in need and for all first responders, elderly, families, nurses, and doctors.

Arrazcaeta spearheaded the effort inspired by Chef Jose Andres’ feed the hunger movement and began reaching out to other restaurants and food services in the community. For the first week, North Georgia Technical College Culinary Program donated vegetables, cream, and potatoes, and Foodland donated chicken.

“We are just trying to stay ahead of what is coming.  We have been lucky we don’t a case jet. We will feed those who need it,” stated Arrazcaeta. “We are a strong tight community, and we are all in this together.”

Donations both monetary and food are welcomed and needed to continue the effort. Any restaurant interested in donating their inventory should contact Arrazcaeta at 706.745.0100. If someone would like to donate money to the effort, a fund is set up at BANK OZK under the name, “Feed Union County 2020.” The bank accepts cash, checks directly at the drive-thru window or please send donations to 51 D Earnest street Blairsville, Ga 30512.

Nani’s will be open to the public for to-go orders Tuesday to Saturday from 11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Here’s a list of resources available for those in need in Union County.

Also, if anyone would like a pick-me-up while working, teaching, or just stuck at home, check out Arrazcaeta’s update video’s on Nani’s Facebook page.

Editor’s note: Since receiving this quote, a positive COVID-19 case is being treated at Union General Hospital. The individual is a Towns County Resident.

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