Ask The Doc! College And Covid-19

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Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

This morning, the doctors discuss how colleges are dealing with Covid-19. When a Student tests positive, the colleges continue classes and give the infected student their own quarantined dorm. Is this the approach we should be taking with everything? Should we worry over the numbers? Hear Doctor Whaley and Doctor Tidman’s point of view on this right here on Ask the Doc!

 

Ask The Doc! Commonly Asked Questions

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This week, Dr. William Whaley answers the commonly asked questions he gets asked every day regarding Covid-19. Dr. Whaley says how long the virus stays on different surfaces. He also describes the cases that have “No Known Exposure.” Meaning these cases can’t be contact traced back to a specific place or person. Dr. Whaley also discusses how long it takes for every virus cell to leave your body. How much progress has been made on the vaccine and what all has to be done in order for it to be released?

 

Ask The Doc! Killing The Fake News

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Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

How do you do what you want amid the virus? Dr. William Whaley talks everything from sports to travel for citizens and maintaining your responsibility.

First up is the masks. Dr. Whaley speaks to the efficacy of mask usage. He talks about using goggles and the suggestions of who should wear them. Face shields, masks, goggles and other protective equipment are exactly what doctors wore for AIDS, Hepatitis, and many other diseases to prevent splatter. Sure, goggles do lower chance to contract the Coronavirus by a small percentage and medical professionals need to wear these things.

BKP and Dr. Whaley make the analogy that in baseball, if someone cannot play, you can always call up a player from the minors or find a replacement, but healthcare professionals don’t have reserves of “players” waiting to be called up.

Dr. Ray Tidman speaks on the subject, too, as he points out that Dr. Whaley wouldn’t wear the shield and mask in the back office as he works, but does wear it in the hallways and with patients. He says, “I want to bring it out to clarify it to the public. I keep trying to emphasize that you need to wear the right mask at the right time and in the right place.”

Taking responsibility and knowing these times is part of the day. Dr. Tidman says to stop shaming and pointing fingers, but also wear the right gear when you need to.

Taking news is important in our age, but the Doctors warn you against some of the outlandish claims of media and certain tv and news doctors. Focusing on the information available is another responsibility in fighting the virus.

Dr. Whaley also speaks on the sports side and how athletes react to playing against empty stadiums as well as treatment for players. Players under contract play the game, but as soon as the player contracts the virus. He is a patient says Dr. Whaley. They have Doctors and the team should stay out of the care. It isn’t about the team and the game at that point. It’s about certainty and nobody knows if it is safe to play and work out at the high level of activity or how soon they should.

He compares the bubbles in NBA and NHL use as they play. The drastic difference in those play styles has shown to be efficient.

Both Doctors agree that it shouldn’t be an authority decision, but rather a group decision of those involved.

This also translates down to new rules, changes in operations and style in high school sports, specifically football right now.

Dr. Tidman also brings up the idea of rule-making amid the fear and reactionary process. This is where he says that the smaller groups of people could come together and make better policies and rules than far off authoritarians handing down those rules. In this way, they can see the information and consensus rather than responding to fear. The fear only causes overreactions and bad situations.

Moving away from the shame and fear is the final thought of Tidman as he points to us, as humans, figuring things out together instead of separating.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

 

Ask The Doc! The good progress in combating the virus

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Ask the Doc takes a look at the opposite side of the line in combating the virus as so many are focusing on the negative.

Dr. William Whaley returns again this week to answer questions of those asking what, if anything, are we doing right about the fight against COVID-19. As always, the tie plays a role. This time, Dr. Whaley wears a tie with balls on it as he speaks to a recurring metaphor he uses.

Handling the virus is like juggling balls in the air as an assistant continually adds one more ball after one more ball.

Making progress against the virus and understanding each stage better has helped to stop adding balls to the juggling and is looking to start removing some of these”factors” and “complications” that can overwhelm a patient.

The next step in combating the virus and the overwhelming, as BKP says, is getting out the information for people to see the progress. BKP walks you through the Department of Public Health Website as Dr. Whaley explains some of the numbers and population comparisons.

With more information, we know a lot more about treatment, we know a lot more about the virus. Dr. Whaley talks about reacting to and treating to turn Cytokine Storms into healthy lungs.

According to the National Cancer Institute, a Cytokine Storm is “a severe immune reaction in which the body releases too many cytokines into the blood too quickly. Cytokines play an important role in normal immune responses, but having a large amount of them released in the body all at once can be harmful. A cytokine storm can occur as a result of an infection, autoimmune condition, or other disease. It may also occur after treatment with some types of immunotherapy. Signs and symptoms include high fever, inflammation (redness and swelling), and severe fatigue and nausea. Sometimes, a cytokine storm may be severe or life threatening and lead to multiple organ failure. Also called hypercytokinemia.”

Cytokine Storm Syndrome is the real threat of the virus as you are “juggling” issues. The syndrome is that major ball that causes everything to fall. Dr. Whaley explains how understanding the coagulation effects and counter the major issues of the syndrome can crater fatality rates.

Thanks to these steps and continuing efforts, Dr. Whaley says that we are lowering the fatality rates of those hospitalized. It is also lowering the number of people that a single positive person infects. He explains that getting an average rate of this below one person is how you can decrease, slow, and kill the disease. He points to efforts like masks and social distancing as just one part of the steps to lower that average.

We also reach into hospitalizations and how admissions aren’t coming from COVID-19 immediately. Dr. Whaley says that you might get tested, but a person has to be sick to be admitted into a hospital. Testing procedures are improving and the hospital admissions come from positive tests.

Along with vaccines possibilities, drugs, treatments, and improvements in our medical response have dropped Atlanta’s mortality rate of hospitalizations in large systems is at 5%. Two months ago that rate was 20%.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

Ask the Doc! The Science and Secondary Effects of Covid-19

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Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

With major spikes in numbers, Ask the Doc! talks about the daily science of treatment of the virus while translating and bringing the science of the virus to you.

Dr. William Whaley’s tie leads into a conversation about the international scope of the virus while comparing medical safety in countries. Which data is viable and what statistics are out of proportion? A 100% increase in deaths could mean going from 1 to 2. Whaley says to focus on people getting sick. So, what do you do about it?

Dr. Whaley also touches on lockdowns and shutdowns have on the spread of the virus as he compares case rates before shutdown and those after shutdowns in 149 countries. But also compares mask usage with a story about two hair stylists in Missouri. With positive tests on these two stylists after having served 139 clients and contact with 6 coworkers. Dr. Whaley said not one of those people tested positive.

Dr. Tidman speaks to schools reopening and the panic onset. Overreactions are hurting our country and people are not calmly assessing the situation. Returning to schools and providing safety for students is possible with scientists and doctors supporting the thought.

But taking into account a student and family together, BKP turns the conversation to sports seasons. Tidman responds with the muddled message of masks in the country. Which mask is the mask people need and who needs them? The Docs go deeper into masks and needs within the community.

As we continue figuring things out amid the virus, Dr. Tidman talks about the learning process and the requirement of discipline. Discipline is the second half of the freedom we own as we must take responsibility as we move into school, into Fall, and into the next steps of recovery.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

 

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

Ask The Doc! Ratios and Better Masks

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BKP is joined by Dr. William Whaley and Dr. Raymond Tidman to discuss the most recent medical news. Dr. Raymond Tidman asks for a better masks that don’t collect fluid throughout the day. The doctors also discuss the importance of putting out ratios.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Redefining normal

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What amazes me about people, as a society, is their dark times. I’m not just talking about America here either. But people in general. Forget nations, borders, and skin. People in times of change and fear can amaze me.

People are stubborn, and I love it. Sure, it has caused a lot of heartache and sorrow in many lives, but in times like this, in moments of darkness when they have a light of hope to hold onto, that stubbornness pays off. We push through, headstrong, and grab each other’s arms and drag each other along.

More than just “getting by” in the last week, I’ve started noticing so many different things about people. As some have started venturing out again, as some are still staying home, I see points of color.

You see, to me, in the past month or two, since the outbreak really kicked up, I have seen a lot of black and white in the world. A lot of cynicism, but a lot of helping each other. That can be great, but that’s very divided. I loved seeing stories about people donating or volunteering, others creating masks. That’s great, but it is the white to balance the black. The color comes in between.

The color comes when I don’t just see people wearing masks, but I had someone create a more “fashionable” mask for me. I have this thing now that has a pattern with superheroes on it. Just days ago, I ran into a woman with a crocheted mask that could hold the masks and filters, but it was designed to look like the “baby-yoda-thing” from The Mandalorian. I asked her about it and she said her daughter loved the show and designed it for her. It even had the ears sticking forward out of the mask from the top of it.

I have seen others wearing designed masks that look like animal mouths. Yeah, sort of cliche, but it was funny to me and I liked it. Of course, we already have masks for men and women to match their outfits for the day. from matching a purse, tie, shirt, dress, shoes. Leave it to us as humans to make sure that the thing keeping us and others safe is going to look just as good as the rest of our outfit.

I’ve seen cloth masks, medical-grade masks, surgical masks, bandana masks, patterned masks, drawn-on-designs, flag patterns, designer logos, and so many others that I feel like I could pen a Dr. Seuss book about it, “One mask, two masks, Red masks, blue masks.”

But its more than making masks our own, the stubbornness stretches to who we are as people. We are social creatures. Yeah, even you introverts in the back, I see you. You may not be as social, but I am willing to bet there is someone you like being around, even if only for small amounts of time. We’ve all seen musicians starting to put on concerts from home, we’ve read about sports coming back this summer to play in empty stadiums.

Yeah, it’s not the same, but when you need to play some music, you get your concert on however you can. Stubbornness wins. I know at least two local musicians doing the exact same thing because they just want to be social, play music, and have some fun. One even does trivia between songs.

A medical student that I spoke with just two days ago said she even thought that the virus has done some good with so many people so aware of the germs in their lives now and the ease that they spread from surface to hand to face. She said, “We in the medical profession have always known, but, now, people are listening.”

I’ve had zoom meetings, both for business and for personal meetings. It has amazed me how quickly that meeting stops if a dog or cat appears on someone’s screen. And nobody complains, they welcome the moment of distraction. And even though it is through a screen, we are inviting people into our homes again. A glimpse into each other’s personal space. We may be social distancing, but I’ve never been closer to some people. Aquaintances I know through social activities, I’ve learned so much about them because I’ve met their kids, their families, their pets as they pass behind a laptop camera.

I’ve seen a lot more literal color, too. I have seen a lot of people out in their yards, playing in the streets, working in a garden. Not far from my house, there is a large pasture on each side of the road. On the left, horses roam the fields, grazing and enjoying the cool air for now. On the right, a very large herd of cows groups up to stand in a drink from a creek running through their field that stretches for what I assume is nearly a mile. Yet, this past month, I’ve found myself driving slower than I normally do through the area and it isn’t because of the animals in the fields. I’ve seen eight kids on bicycles. I’ve not seen this before in the two years that I’ve lived in my house.

They ride the road between these fields with a German Shephard close at their heels. Laughing and racing, I’ve noticed them at midday several days in a row. I don’t know them, but I politely wave as I pass them and go on to my errands or work. A few sit in a driveway, one of them drawing on the asphalt with a piece of chalk.

I’ve smelled the honeysuckles blooming as my allergies go into fits, but I’ve also smelled more backyard campfires, grills, and meat cooking.

It’s these little things that I’ve noticed now.

My world changed, I saw a lot of black and white. But, just like when I was a child laying in the floor of my Dad’s living room with a coloring book, I’ve taken this past month to fill in a lot of the black and white pictures with a little bit of work and a few broken crayons. And thanks to that, I have a lot more color in my book.

Bryce Ware 3D Prints PPE for Hospital

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Fannin County High School (FCHS) Freshman, Bryce Ware, used a Makerbot 3D printer to produce Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Fannin Regional Hospital in Blue Ridge, GA.  Bryce wanted to use his expertise in 3D printing to support the local efforts to combat COVID-19.  Bryce is an active member of the Technology Student Association(TSA) at FCHS.

Bryce was asked by Dr. Barbara Wall, Director of Career, Technical, and Agricultural Education (CTAE) for the Georgia Department of Education, to represent CTAE students at the CTAE Career and Industry Advisory Council meeting on May 6th.  Bryce was given 5 minutes to present his project to business, industry, and educational leaders from around the State of Georgia.  Bryce did an outstanding job explaining his project to the audience in the virtual meeting.

Originally, Bryce produced several masks and worked with Dr. Causey in Blairsville to complete the masks and deliver them where needed.  On his most recent production, Bryce completed 100% of the process himself.  Bryce provided reusable respirators in sizes small, medium, and large for the staff at Fannin Regional.  Bryce also produced protective face shields.

Jason Jones, Chief Executive Officer for Fannin Regional, was extremely appreciative of Bryce’s contribution and stated “These face shields are difficult to purchase at this time, and we are going to need these shields as we begin to resume our normal hospital operations.”  Mr. Jones was also impressed with the design of the masks because they are reusable.  The hospital staff were all surprised when Bryce informed them that he is a freshman at FCHS.

“I am very proud of Bryce and his efforts to support our local healthcare professionals during this difficult time.  Bryce is an outstanding student, and I am looking forward to working with him during his high school engineering courses.”  Bubba Gibbs, TSA Advisor and Engineering Teacher at FCHS.

 

Ask The Doc! Clearing The Air

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Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

This morning, Dr. William Whaley and Raymond Tidman clear the air of the false Covid-19 information floating around. They discuss antibodies, how to protect yourself and others, and hotbeds for the virus.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask the Doc! Airspace particles and the virus

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Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

Dr. William Whaley and Dr. Ray Tidmon are back at Circuit World with BKP! They talk about air space particles and testing. There are only three types of people that need to be tested per Dr. Tidman. Those people being “sick, healthcare providers, and those people who are taking care of the at-risk”.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask the Doc! Surface Time

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Is there such a thing as surface time for COVID-19? If so, is there a cure for it other than chemicals? BKP asks Dr. Whaley and Dr. Tidman. Their answer is sunlight. Does this mean that the summer months could be the cure-all?

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

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