North Georgia Senior Living: Fall Prevention Month

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This week, Jessie Barton Comes in to discuss Fall Prevention Month. She explains how falls can lead to a decline in health and quality of life and some steps to prevent falls before they happen. Even if a fall isn’t bad, it can lead to many health issues. For more information about Fall Prevention Month and how to prevent falls visit Cameron Hall‘s Facebook Page!

 

Ask The Doc! College And Covid-19

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

This morning, the doctors discuss how colleges are dealing with Covid-19. When a Student tests positive, the colleges continue classes and give the infected student their own quarantined dorm. Is this the approach we should be taking with everything? Should we worry over the numbers? Hear Doctor Whaley and Doctor Tidman’s point of view on this right here on Ask the Doc!

 

Ask the Doc! The battle of information and experts

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ask the doc, virus, information

Going around the nation in photos and articles, BKP highlights the first day back to school with some of the issues and struggles that people are seeing. From packed hallways to sports cancellations, these are merely the effects of virus’ continuation.

The first step to returning to school is staying up to date on information. Your state’s Department of Public Health has that information in whatever form they are reporting in. But for families with students, whether you’re getting on a bus today, or getting on your laptop for school at home. Maintaining awareness and an informed study of your state’s situation will keep you up to date with the Docs, and up to date on your own choices in the coming days.

BKP starts our discussions off with comparisons of the available information from recent days as well as a comparison of age groups showing a vast increase of younger people (age 18-29). These people could be those ignoring guidelines and social distancing. But they also show one of the lower hospitalizations counts of all people over 18-years-old. They also have the lowest death rate of those groups.

Dr. William Whaley clarifies further saying there isn’t a lot of sick people there, just a lot of positive tests. A very important clarification as Dr. Whaley explains that study isolating people for 21 days with positive tests. That test showed 30 percent of those positive cases never showing a single symptom. The viral load of that 30 percent is just as high as those who do get sick. The contagion is still there and still spreading. Along with this point, Dr. Raymond Tidman offers another note saying a lot of our decision making points are not considering this as well.

The Doctors also look at the treatment guidelines and how much has change since March of 2020. Is the medical community really looking at Hydroxychloroquine and it’s uses? Who should be taking it? When is it viable? Who is approving the drug? These questions all surround these treatment guidelines. Who is supposed to tell you what is effective? Dr. Whaley talks about the steps of drug studies and the misinformation that gets people sidetracked or panicked?

Dr. Tidman agrees that it is difficult to filter these things and work towards a common understanding. People are so inundated with information, technology, sources, and videos. Dr. Tidman says to focus on results and what you know. Don’t let the internet and the vast amounts of information and misinformation jerk you around.

Looking through previous episodes, we talk about some of the predictions that came true in sports with games being cancelled and positive cases rising. Players are following old habits and not maintaining the new rules. Major League Baseball has already warned teams that failure to follow the new rules will see teams suspended for the season. Additionally, more and more players are opting out of their sports this year to avoid the risk. The NFL opt out saw 66 player saying they won’t play this year. According to Dr. Whaley, many of those players were the higher risk players, front lineman and high contact positions.

The changing game is a mirror of our society, according to Whaley. Just like the games, societal behavior will change as he suspects the virus will “smolder” in a form of presence for years. Not enough to be a pandemic, but enough to continue changing your behavior.

Because of that, Dr. Tidman counters with a point of saying that people don’t live like they are in a hospital. He points out that physicians tell people things that work and those that don’t. They can help people with finding acts that are troublesome and things that can help them. A doctor can put a patient in a controlled environment, teach them about an illness, show them how to eat and live and move, but people don’t live in controlled environments.

In that same way, there are many people saying exactly what to do and how to do it in the face of the virus. Verging on tyranny, people will not follow everything they are told to do. However, Dr. Tidman says that educating people and informing them on all the details and mitigation steps that will allow them to live their lives and live with the consequences of their lives.

Shifting topics, one decisions that some are wishing they could do is get the virus at home with the family and immunize to it naturally so that they can move on as normal. An idea rooted in the desire to just get past the issue after 5-6 months of this virus.

Circling back to the beginning thoughts, the question of viability in that idea is the same question of public health attempting to isolate and quarantine positive cases. The difference between being positive and being sick is pushing authorities on how to carry on normally.

Dr. Tidman also points all the way back to two cruise ships full of people. One of those ships got masks and used them to slow the spread. Dr. Tidman noted that even if they got infected, some of those people using masks got lower doses of the virus and became asymptomatic as their bodies were better and more quickly able to respond and build immunity to it. The “viral load,” as Dr. Whaley calls it, is important in those cases. That said, Dr. Tidman notes that some people need to avoid the virus. Higher risk people are higher risk because the could die from the virus. Those risks are too high.

The questions of need, risk, immunity, life, mitigation, and exposure all need to go through experts. Doctors who have seen the virus. But, ultimately, we as people make our own decisions. We choose what we do and how we respond. We grow in our lives through those decisions. The best we can do is find those experts who have the best information and avoid the misguidance that is overabundant.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

Ask The Doc! Killing The Fake News

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

How do you do what you want amid the virus? Dr. William Whaley talks everything from sports to travel for citizens and maintaining your responsibility.

First up is the masks. Dr. Whaley speaks to the efficacy of mask usage. He talks about using goggles and the suggestions of who should wear them. Face shields, masks, goggles and other protective equipment are exactly what doctors wore for AIDS, Hepatitis, and many other diseases to prevent splatter. Sure, goggles do lower chance to contract the Coronavirus by a small percentage and medical professionals need to wear these things.

BKP and Dr. Whaley make the analogy that in baseball, if someone cannot play, you can always call up a player from the minors or find a replacement, but healthcare professionals don’t have reserves of “players” waiting to be called up.

Dr. Ray Tidman speaks on the subject, too, as he points out that Dr. Whaley wouldn’t wear the shield and mask in the back office as he works, but does wear it in the hallways and with patients. He says, “I want to bring it out to clarify it to the public. I keep trying to emphasize that you need to wear the right mask at the right time and in the right place.”

Taking responsibility and knowing these times is part of the day. Dr. Tidman says to stop shaming and pointing fingers, but also wear the right gear when you need to.

Taking news is important in our age, but the Doctors warn you against some of the outlandish claims of media and certain tv and news doctors. Focusing on the information available is another responsibility in fighting the virus.

Dr. Whaley also speaks on the sports side and how athletes react to playing against empty stadiums as well as treatment for players. Players under contract play the game, but as soon as the player contracts the virus. He is a patient says Dr. Whaley. They have Doctors and the team should stay out of the care. It isn’t about the team and the game at that point. It’s about certainty and nobody knows if it is safe to play and work out at the high level of activity or how soon they should.

He compares the bubbles in NBA and NHL use as they play. The drastic difference in those play styles has shown to be efficient.

Both Doctors agree that it shouldn’t be an authority decision, but rather a group decision of those involved.

This also translates down to new rules, changes in operations and style in high school sports, specifically football right now.

Dr. Tidman also brings up the idea of rule-making amid the fear and reactionary process. This is where he says that the smaller groups of people could come together and make better policies and rules than far off authoritarians handing down those rules. In this way, they can see the information and consensus rather than responding to fear. The fear only causes overreactions and bad situations.

Moving away from the shame and fear is the final thought of Tidman as he points to us, as humans, figuring things out together instead of separating.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

 

Discover Dahlonega: When you’re stuck at home – Gardening tips from the experts

Arts & Entertainment, Lifestyle
Garden

(Article by Courtney Randolph in conjunction with the Dahlonega-Lumpkin Chamber and Visitors Bureau)

Feeling a bit restless, and looking for something to do? We sure do love a good DIY, especially when it involves some vitamin D! Learn how to build your own DIY garden from JoAnn Goldenburg, owner of the Dahlonega Butterfly Farm. If vegetable gardens and medicinal plants are more your thing, learn some tips from one of our favorite doctors, Dr. Whitfield.

Follow these steps to build a thriving butterfly destination and watch the colorful visitors arrive!

What Are Host Plants? Do I Need Them?
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Photo: The Dahlonega Butterfly Farm

“HOST PLANTS are the plants where the female butterflies lay their eggs and where the caterpillars forage.  Host plants aren’t always the prettiest plants in the garden but they’ll definitely bring butterflies into your yard.  A few common host plants include Milkweed for the Monarchs, Parsley & Fennel for the Black Swallowtails, and Passion Vine for the Gulf Fritillary (to name a few).  Keep this in mind; caterpillars eat a lot!  So if you want to enjoy raising your own caterpillars – make sure to plant several host plants.”

 

What are “nectar plants” and how do I choose which one to plant?

Garden

Photo: The Dahlonega Butterfly Farm

NECTAR PLANTS support adult butterflies (and other beneficial insects) with their sweet nectar and add beautiful seasonal color to your garden.   It’s a good idea to have a variety of nectar plants which bloom throughout the summer to give your butterflies a regular source of food.  There are hundreds of nectar plants to choose from but you’ll want to pick the right plants based on your zone and location.  North Georgia is in Zone 7a, which is great for growing Perennial Lantana, Verbena, Coreopsis, Zinnias, Black-Eyed Susan, and Buddlei.  For a seasonal pop of color you can also add annuals, Begonias, Pansies, Impatiens and Geraniums.  And don’t forget the shrubs and trees; Butterflies need a safe place to rest and sleep.

 

How To Create a Butterfly Garden

Garden

Photo: The Dahlonega Butterfly Farm

A SUNNY SPOT and a small water puddle are also important to complete your butterfly habitat.  Butterflies love to soak up the “sun” because they’re cold blooded and need the heat to fly. Butterflies need a water source to stay hydrated.. You can try adding a shallow dish to your garden with water or fruit juice.   As a matter of fact, some butterflies prefer fruits and will be happy to feed on rotting bananas, oranges, mangoes or even dung. Last but not least; try to eliminate or reduce the use of pesticides and herbicides.  Chemicals aren’t safe for butterflies, pets, or humans.  Butterflies need a healthy environment and so do we!”

 Top Photo provided by instagram account user, @i_shoot_people77

Gardening Tips from Dr. Whitfield

“Most of us find “sheltering in place” something to be endured until the COVID-19 pandemic is over. Plants, on the other hand, are of course happy to stay put and flourish in dirt, no less. And like most of us, they do even better when they are surrounded by nurturing companions, hence the gardening practice of companion planting.

Now that most of us are expected to spend most of our time at home, an escape to the garden for exercise and sun is a logical stress reliever to being home bound. So, what better time than this spring planting season to add to our gardening “know how”?

To that end, I would like to share some of my favorite gardening tips, especially for our first-time gardeners. So, let’s talk about frost dates, using planting calendars, and companion planting techniques which may help you grow a beautiful and productive garden.”

Frost Dates
“Frost dates can be confusing. Gardeners talk about the last “hard” or “killing” frosts and “light” frosts. A frost date is the average date of the first or last light freeze that occurs in spring or fall. Dave’s Garden website tells us that, on average, our risk of frost in Dahlonega is from October 27 through April 10. And, almost certainly, we will receive frost from November 14 through March 21. We are almost guaranteed not to get frost from May 1 through October 9. Our frost-free growing season is about 200 days. I try to be relatively conservative with frost dates and use March 30 as the last killing frost date and May 15 as the last average light frost date in Dahlonega. There will be a lot of variation in these reported dates due to local weather, microclimates or topography, but the conservative dates seem to work well for me.”
Garden Planners
“These are wonderful slide rule type planners that you can use to enter the last frost date and learn when you should start seeds indoors and/or outdoors. They provide information such as recommended plants, dates to start indoor seeds and the types of seeds to start, first outdoor planting dates, and expected harvest dates. You can also find programs on line to help you develop and save your own gardening data.

My first garden planner was called “Clyde’s Garden Planner – Clyde’s Vegetable Planting Slide Chart” which I found on line. I also have a “Garden Vegetable Guide” that United Community Bank gave away a few years ago, and it provides data such as: how easy or challenging different seeds are to grow, when to start or plant them, planting depth, row width/ spacing between seeds, days to maturity, hardiness and type of soil. The University of Georgia has a fantastic web site you can easily access. Just google: Vegetable Garden Calendar, UGA Cooperative Extension.”

What Should I Plant? What is Companion Planting?
“Said to be part experience, part folklore, and part wishful thinking, most companion planting teachings are passed down by gardeners who experimented with different pairings of plants and had some success. The companion planting technique is the result of placing various crops close to each other so they symbiotically compliment each other leading to greater vigor, growth and often better flavor. Some companion plants are used to repel and deter insect pests and diseases. Companion planting also involves separating plants that are antagonistic to each other.

Tomatoes are one of my favorite vegetables. Here is some information you may find helpful if you plan to grow your own tomatoes.
Companions for tomatoes include: amaranth, asparagus, basil, bean, borage, calendula, celery, chive, cleome, cosmos, cucumber, garlic, lemon balm, lettuce, marigold, mint, nasturtium, onion, parsley, peas, sage, stinging nettle, sow thistle, and squash. Amaranth may repel insects. Basil improves growth and flavor and repels mosquitoes and flies. Borage improves growth and flavor and repels tomato worms. Bee balm, chives, and parsley are reported to improve tomato health and flavor. Garlic repels red spider mites and garlic sprays help control late blight. Stinging nettle nearby improves taste, while sow thistle aids growth. Tomato antagonists include: cabbage and members of the Brassica family (broccoli, Brussels sprouts, collards, cauliflower, kale, kohlrabi, rutabaga, turin), corn, fennel, and mature dill plants.
Tomatoes are in the nightshade family and it is best to avoid planting together vegetables in the same family, like eggplants, peppers, and potatoes, which are susceptible to early and late blight. Also, avoid planting your tomatoes near walnut and butternut trees as they produce juglone. Juglone is an allelopathic substance produced by walnut and butternut trees which stunts the growth of other plants.”Companion Planting Resources
“Some of my favorite resources on Companion Planting include: Carrots Love Tomatoes by Louise Riotte and Great Garden Companions by Sally Jean Cunningham. (My disclaimer: Contrary to popular belief, tomatoes and carrots may not have a symbiotic relationship. In fact there is some suggestion that tomato plants can stunt the growth of carrots.)
The glory of gardening, according to Alfred Austin, English Poet Laureate, means “hands in the dirt, head in the sun, heart with nature. To nurture a garden,” Austin says, “is to feed not just the body, but the soul.” What could be a better remedy for our couch stiffened bodies and soul stagnating confinement than putting our hands in the dirt and heads in the sun, nurturing our souls with garden creativity, in partnership with the Creator, enjoying our ever-improving garden paradises during this COVID-19 spring.”
Thank you Dr. Whitfield and JoAnn for the lovely gardening tips! Try incorporating some of these tips this spring while you stay-inplace for a gorgeous life-giving garden! You’ll thank yourself later, we promise!

 

 

Read more of Discover Dahlonega on FYN’s SUNDAY EDITION! If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

Ask the Doc! The Science and Secondary Effects of Covid-19

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

With major spikes in numbers, Ask the Doc! talks about the daily science of treatment of the virus while translating and bringing the science of the virus to you.

Dr. William Whaley’s tie leads into a conversation about the international scope of the virus while comparing medical safety in countries. Which data is viable and what statistics are out of proportion? A 100% increase in deaths could mean going from 1 to 2. Whaley says to focus on people getting sick. So, what do you do about it?

Dr. Whaley also touches on lockdowns and shutdowns have on the spread of the virus as he compares case rates before shutdown and those after shutdowns in 149 countries. But also compares mask usage with a story about two hair stylists in Missouri. With positive tests on these two stylists after having served 139 clients and contact with 6 coworkers. Dr. Whaley said not one of those people tested positive.

Dr. Tidman speaks to schools reopening and the panic onset. Overreactions are hurting our country and people are not calmly assessing the situation. Returning to schools and providing safety for students is possible with scientists and doctors supporting the thought.

But taking into account a student and family together, BKP turns the conversation to sports seasons. Tidman responds with the muddled message of masks in the country. Which mask is the mask people need and who needs them? The Docs go deeper into masks and needs within the community.

As we continue figuring things out amid the virus, Dr. Tidman talks about the learning process and the requirement of discipline. Discipline is the second half of the freedom we own as we must take responsibility as we move into school, into Fall, and into the next steps of recovery.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

 

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

North Georgia Senior Living: Waiting To Press Go

Lifestyle

Jessi Barton joins the Friday show to discuss safe environments amid the virus. Cameron Hall is loosening some restrictions while adhering to guidelines. Despite not being back to “normal,” Jessi talks about their window visits and medical care. With a light of hope for the future, she talks about taking the small steps towards that, but residents are still waiting to press the go button on outdoor visits and in person visits without glass in between.

She touches on state guidelines and restrictions and how Cameron Hall in Ellijay is addressing state as well as local county issues while focusing on the five dimensions of wellness; physical, spiritual, intellectual, emotional, and social.

Focusing on wellness instead of care, Jessi takes us through the struggles of focusing on the dimensions of wellness in new ways and provide these needs for each individual resident. It is a balance as we all continue treating elders “like fine china.”

Sponsored by Cameron Hall in Ellijay, you can follow more of North Georgia Senior Living through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

Ask The Doc! Confused Facts

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Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

Walking you through the Coronavirus updates with the Department of Public Health, North Georgia’s surge, and the public’s concerns. With more cases daily, Dr. William Whaley and Dr. Ray Tidman speak with BKP on the virus and testing with Georgians from a medical standpoint and how we need to be looking at longer stretches of time with tests instead of singular days. We look at the graphs with statistical analysis of cases in Georgia with Dr. Whaley. However, Dr. Tidman counters with comparisons of urban Atlanta versus a more rural North Georgia while touching on Gilmer’s recent positive test in the courts.

Additionally, we breach the discussions of schools and education amid the virus. With the resurgence of the virus, is “home learning” really the best idea? Topics like wearing masks in schools and the precautions that schools are taking become part of the discussion as the compare schools allowing families who choose “home learning” while having others in school and others with less restrictions. Dr. Whaley says the decisions fall with the families instead of the school administrators.

Ultimately, we talk about the responsibility involved in the virus. Individual responsibilities reiterates what the Doctors have been saying. Protect yourself, don’t rely on others for your protection and the responsibility of your health.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

 

North Georgia Senior Living: The Media’s Impact on Senior Living

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BKP and Jessie Barton discuss how the media has impacted the way people look at senior living. She explains the fear of waiting too long to go to the doctor.

Sponsored by Cameron Hall in Ellijay, you can follow more of North Georgia Senior Living through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

North Georgia Senior Living: Alzheimer’s Awareness Month

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This Week, Jessie Barton comes on the show to bring awareness to Alzheimer’s and other brain conditions.

Sponsored by Cameron Hall in Ellijay, you can follow more of North Georgia Senior Living through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask The Doc! Ratios and Better Masks

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ask the doc, virus, information

BKP is joined by Dr. William Whaley and Dr. Raymond Tidman to discuss the most recent medical news. Dr. Raymond Tidman asks for a better masks that don’t collect fluid throughout the day. The doctors also discuss the importance of putting out ratios.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask The Doc! Vaccines and a Second Wave

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ask the doc

BKP is joined by Dr. William Whaley and Dr. Raymond Tidman to discuss the concept of vaccines. Dr. Whaley says a vaccine wouldn’t be available until late December. They also discuss a second wave.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask The Doc! High Risk Group Clusters

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

This morning Dr. William Whaley and Dr. Tidman discuss the most unanswered questions revolving around Covid-19. Can the kids go back to school? Is it safe? Will there be a spike in cases? Will there be a vaccine?

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

North Georgia Senior Living: Community Cat!

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This week Jessie Barton discusses the newest member of Cameron Hall, Hunter Binks the community cat. They also touch on the other creatures coming to visit the residents.

Sponsored by Cameron Hall in Ellijay, you can follow more of North Georgia Senior Living through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask The Doc! Attack Rate and The Asymptomatic Population

Lifestyle
ask the doc, virus, information

This morning #BKP is joined by Dr. Whaley and Dr. Tidman to discuss Covid-19 and the effectiveness of masks. Dr. Whaley also discusses the percentage of the population that is walking around with the virus and is unaware.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

North Georgia Senior Living: The Extra Steps Being Taken

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Jessi Barton joins us to discuss the protocols and extra steps being taken to protect our seniors. She also touches on how long she believes it will take to reopen.

Sponsored by Cameron Hall in Ellijay, you can follow more of North Georgia Senior Living through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

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