Chrysanthemums

Community, Just For Fun

Chrysanthemums, also called mums, are the Queen of Fall Flowers. They can have gorgeous flowers each fall and bring a lot of color to the home this time of the year. There are several nurseries around here that grow beautiful mums. Let’s talk about some of the properties of this plant and what you could do to have mums in your yard.

Mums are a member of the daisy family (Asteraceae). This is one of the biggest families in the plant kingdom with a wide variety of flowering plants. The mums were first cultivated in the 15th century B.C. in China. In the 8th century A.D., the mum made its way to Japan. They were so popular there that the mum became the official seal of the emperor. The mum was introduced to the Western world in 1753 by Karl Linnaeus, a Swedish botanist. Growers from ancient China would probably not recognize modern-day mums due to the breeding that has given them more showy flowers. Chrysanthemum is also the source of an insecticide called pyrethrum. Because this insecticide is developed from a natural source it is considered an organic insecticide.

The easiest way to have blooming mums at your house each year will be to buy them in the fall from a local nursery. However, if you are interested in growing your own mums it is possible. There are many different varieties available, so talking with a local nursery will help you choose a variety that is acclimatized to our area. They do best when planted in the spring after the last frost. Planting in the spring will give them time to develop a root system so that the following winter they will be able to survive. Well-drained soils with full sun are the best for growth. Mums need a slightly acidic soil with a pH near 6.5.

After planting fertilize mums with 5-10-5 fertilizer. The high phosphorus will assist root growth on mums. As the mum is growing in the summer pinching the tips of the mum will increase the amount of branching on the plant. More branching will lead to a fuller plant. Pinch the top half-inch to a full inch of the plant to encourage branching. Pinch every four to six weeks until August when the flower buds begin to appear.

Mums are relatively easy to take care of, but there are a couple of diseases to look out for. Some of the most common diseases are powdery mildew, blight, leaf spot, and rust. These diseases are fairly easy to control either by fungicide applications or removing the infected leaves. Spider mites and aphids can be pests of mums. They can be controlled by insecticides but good coverage of the plant is necessary to control these pests. Spider mites and aphids are capable of population explosions in a very short amount of time, therefore make sure that you completely cover the top and bottom of the leaves when spraying for these pests.

If you have questions about growing mums please contact your local Extension Office. Or send me an email at Jacob.Williams@uga.edu.

Pet Of The Week! TinkerBell

Fast & Furriest

This week’s star of the show is the lovely Tinkerbell! Tink is a roughly 13 week old puppy in need of a loving home. She has two siblings also located at the Humane Society Of Blue Ridge. Rena says she will most likely be a medium to large dog. Tink is currently up for foster to adopt as well as her two siblings. She is extremely sweet and ready to find her forever home. If you’re looking to adopt an animal check out the humane society and all of their furry friends!

 

North Georgia Senior Living: Fall Prevention Month

Community
ready, quality

This week, Jessie Barton Comes in to discuss Fall Prevention Month. She explains how falls can lead to a decline in health and quality of life and some steps to prevent falls before they happen. Even if a fall isn’t bad, it can lead to many health issues. For more information about Fall Prevention Month and how to prevent falls visit Cameron Hall‘s Facebook Page!

 

Chiggers

Lifestyle

Now is the time of year when chiggers are going to be most active. If you haven’t, then consider yourself fortunate, because you live a blessed life. Let’s talk about chiggers, what they are, and what you can do to protect yourself from them.

 

Some people call chiggers red bugs because they are tiny red mites that are less that 1/50th of an inch long. Chigger are mites that are still in their larval stage. The larval stage is the only one that bites. The other stages of the chigger life cycle either lay eggs or prey on small insects. Chiggers like to live in areas that are full of brush and debris. They can be found in leaf litter. If you have areas with tall grass, they’ll like that too. Chiggers mainly bite rodents and rabbits. So, if you have areas that make a good habitat for rodents and rabbits then there is a good chance that you’ll have mites as well. Female mites will lay their eggs in the late winter, which will hatch in the spring. Chiggers will reach peak population in mid-summer and remain active until fall. They’ll be killed off by a hard freeze.

 

Chiggers only bite, they don’t bury under the skin. When they bite they inject their saliva which has a skin dissolving enzyme in it. As your skin cells dissolve, they drink it up. The saliva that they inject causes irritation, which makes you itch. Chiggers can stay latched on for three or more days, so if you have a chigger bite it’s best to wash that spot with lather repeatedly, and then dab the spot with an antiseptic. That will kill most of the chiggers on you.

 

Chiggers typically like to bite in tight places. That means you’lloften get their bites underneath your socks, in your waist band, or armpits.

 

Chiggers are susceptible to dehydration. Therefore, they like to populate areas with shade and high humidity. Removing brush piles and leaves, keeping grass cut, and removing bushes will eliminate areas that they like to live. Blackberry bushes seem to be a particularly favorite habitat. Chiggers don’t like temperatures over 90 (I don’t blame them), so when our temperatures drop as summer ends, chiggers will become more active.

 

There are some chemicals that can be used as repellents or to kill chiggers. Products containing DEET will be effective at repelling chiggers, mosquitoes, biting flies, gnats, and ticks. You can also spray it on your clothing to keep them off your clothes. Oil of lemon eucalyptus can be used as a repellent, except for children under 3 years old. Products containing permethrin can be used on clothing to kill chiggers and ticks.

 

Chiggers are very aggravating to have, but hopefully this article has given you some options for how to deal with chigger bites and how to prevent them from getting on you. If you have questions about chiggers contact your county Extension Office or email me at Jacob.Williams@uga.edu.

 

On September 28 I will be hosting a Radon Education Program. This event will be virtual, but there is some limited in person seating available. Pre-registration is required for this free event. Call the Union County Extension Office at 706-439-6030 to pre-register.

Homeward Bound, Jack

Fast & Furriest

Meet Jack, a 14 year old Jack Russell terrier with the heart and mind of a pup half his age.  This little guy weighs 17 ½ lbs.  Jack is good on a leash; house trained; and at this time, is confused as to why he is in a kennel.  He was in a home where he was loved his whole life but his dad passed away and the family didn’t want him.  Jack’s adoption fee is $90.  He is current on all vaccinations and neutered.

Jack is located at Homeward Bound Pet Rescue in Blue Ridge, GA.

Apply online:  www.hbpr.org

 

Ask the Doc! The battle of information and experts

Lifestyle
ask the doc, virus, information

Going around the nation in photos and articles, BKP highlights the first day back to school with some of the issues and struggles that people are seeing. From packed hallways to sports cancellations, these are merely the effects of virus’ continuation.

The first step to returning to school is staying up to date on information. Your state’s Department of Public Health has that information in whatever form they are reporting in. But for families with students, whether you’re getting on a bus today, or getting on your laptop for school at home. Maintaining awareness and an informed study of your state’s situation will keep you up to date with the Docs, and up to date on your own choices in the coming days.

BKP starts our discussions off with comparisons of the available information from recent days as well as a comparison of age groups showing a vast increase of younger people (age 18-29). These people could be those ignoring guidelines and social distancing. But they also show one of the lower hospitalizations counts of all people over 18-years-old. They also have the lowest death rate of those groups.

Dr. William Whaley clarifies further saying there isn’t a lot of sick people there, just a lot of positive tests. A very important clarification as Dr. Whaley explains that study isolating people for 21 days with positive tests. That test showed 30 percent of those positive cases never showing a single symptom. The viral load of that 30 percent is just as high as those who do get sick. The contagion is still there and still spreading. Along with this point, Dr. Raymond Tidman offers another note saying a lot of our decision making points are not considering this as well.

The Doctors also look at the treatment guidelines and how much has change since March of 2020. Is the medical community really looking at Hydroxychloroquine and it’s uses? Who should be taking it? When is it viable? Who is approving the drug? These questions all surround these treatment guidelines. Who is supposed to tell you what is effective? Dr. Whaley talks about the steps of drug studies and the misinformation that gets people sidetracked or panicked?

Dr. Tidman agrees that it is difficult to filter these things and work towards a common understanding. People are so inundated with information, technology, sources, and videos. Dr. Tidman says to focus on results and what you know. Don’t let the internet and the vast amounts of information and misinformation jerk you around.

Looking through previous episodes, we talk about some of the predictions that came true in sports with games being cancelled and positive cases rising. Players are following old habits and not maintaining the new rules. Major League Baseball has already warned teams that failure to follow the new rules will see teams suspended for the season. Additionally, more and more players are opting out of their sports this year to avoid the risk. The NFL opt out saw 66 player saying they won’t play this year. According to Dr. Whaley, many of those players were the higher risk players, front lineman and high contact positions.

The changing game is a mirror of our society, according to Whaley. Just like the games, societal behavior will change as he suspects the virus will “smolder” in a form of presence for years. Not enough to be a pandemic, but enough to continue changing your behavior.

Because of that, Dr. Tidman counters with a point of saying that people don’t live like they are in a hospital. He points out that physicians tell people things that work and those that don’t. They can help people with finding acts that are troublesome and things that can help them. A doctor can put a patient in a controlled environment, teach them about an illness, show them how to eat and live and move, but people don’t live in controlled environments.

In that same way, there are many people saying exactly what to do and how to do it in the face of the virus. Verging on tyranny, people will not follow everything they are told to do. However, Dr. Tidman says that educating people and informing them on all the details and mitigation steps that will allow them to live their lives and live with the consequences of their lives.

Shifting topics, one decisions that some are wishing they could do is get the virus at home with the family and immunize to it naturally so that they can move on as normal. An idea rooted in the desire to just get past the issue after 5-6 months of this virus.

Circling back to the beginning thoughts, the question of viability in that idea is the same question of public health attempting to isolate and quarantine positive cases. The difference between being positive and being sick is pushing authorities on how to carry on normally.

Dr. Tidman also points all the way back to two cruise ships full of people. One of those ships got masks and used them to slow the spread. Dr. Tidman noted that even if they got infected, some of those people using masks got lower doses of the virus and became asymptomatic as their bodies were better and more quickly able to respond and build immunity to it. The “viral load,” as Dr. Whaley calls it, is important in those cases. That said, Dr. Tidman notes that some people need to avoid the virus. Higher risk people are higher risk because the could die from the virus. Those risks are too high.

The questions of need, risk, immunity, life, mitigation, and exposure all need to go through experts. Doctors who have seen the virus. But, ultimately, we as people make our own decisions. We choose what we do and how we respond. We grow in our lives through those decisions. The best we can do is find those experts who have the best information and avoid the misguidance that is overabundant.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

North Georgia Senior Living: Losing Quality Of Life

Lifestyle
ready, quality

With a rainy forecast, Jessi and BKP talk about the river and the quality of the outdoor activities they could attend since the rain stopped before the morning. And Jessi recalls an inspirational moment she noticed as a Senior Concierge.

However, the real issue of the day arises as the two ask one of the most important questions in senior care. “When is the right time?”

The question leaves a blank in the mind, such a large question amid someone’s entire life, looking for the right time to seize an opportunity, to make a change, to venture out on a new adventure, or so many others. But with Jessi, the question becomes when is the right time to transition to a senior living facility?

As so many think a senior facility means a drop in quality of life, Jessi talks about the details of that transition and the regrets of some who have to attempt it “last minute.” She says there is not crystal ball to foresee the time to start preparing. The two ideas are intertwined however. Taking time to understand the quality of life can help you understand the need for a senior living facility to maintain that quality.

Maintaining the conversations and a real assessment can make sure you don’t miss the opportunity and end up with regrets because the quality of life has degraded further than a Senior Living Facility can care for and provide for that need.

The stumbling block to that is the unwillingness to see one’s parent as aging or at a point where they are too tired to maintain a house.

Jessi also talks about her personal experience in the industry and the “blessing and curse” that it provides. It provides more awareness as she sees the changes and is more sensitive to those needs. Yet, it also highlights each stage of change and aging signs in one’s self, one’s family, and all branches of the family.

You can always find out more about Senior Living, Jessi Barton, or the Senior Living Facility she works at, Cameron Hall, by calling 706-515-4100.
Sponsored by Cameron Hall in Ellijay, you can follow more of North Georgia Senior Living through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

Ask The Doc! The good progress in combating the virus

Lifestyle
ask the doc, virus, information

Ask the Doc takes a look at the opposite side of the line in combating the virus as so many are focusing on the negative.

Dr. William Whaley returns again this week to answer questions of those asking what, if anything, are we doing right about the fight against COVID-19. As always, the tie plays a role. This time, Dr. Whaley wears a tie with balls on it as he speaks to a recurring metaphor he uses.

Handling the virus is like juggling balls in the air as an assistant continually adds one more ball after one more ball.

Making progress against the virus and understanding each stage better has helped to stop adding balls to the juggling and is looking to start removing some of these”factors” and “complications” that can overwhelm a patient.

The next step in combating the virus and the overwhelming, as BKP says, is getting out the information for people to see the progress. BKP walks you through the Department of Public Health Website as Dr. Whaley explains some of the numbers and population comparisons.

With more information, we know a lot more about treatment, we know a lot more about the virus. Dr. Whaley talks about reacting to and treating to turn Cytokine Storms into healthy lungs.

According to the National Cancer Institute, a Cytokine Storm is “a severe immune reaction in which the body releases too many cytokines into the blood too quickly. Cytokines play an important role in normal immune responses, but having a large amount of them released in the body all at once can be harmful. A cytokine storm can occur as a result of an infection, autoimmune condition, or other disease. It may also occur after treatment with some types of immunotherapy. Signs and symptoms include high fever, inflammation (redness and swelling), and severe fatigue and nausea. Sometimes, a cytokine storm may be severe or life threatening and lead to multiple organ failure. Also called hypercytokinemia.”

Cytokine Storm Syndrome is the real threat of the virus as you are “juggling” issues. The syndrome is that major ball that causes everything to fall. Dr. Whaley explains how understanding the coagulation effects and counter the major issues of the syndrome can crater fatality rates.

Thanks to these steps and continuing efforts, Dr. Whaley says that we are lowering the fatality rates of those hospitalized. It is also lowering the number of people that a single positive person infects. He explains that getting an average rate of this below one person is how you can decrease, slow, and kill the disease. He points to efforts like masks and social distancing as just one part of the steps to lower that average.

We also reach into hospitalizations and how admissions aren’t coming from COVID-19 immediately. Dr. Whaley says that you might get tested, but a person has to be sick to be admitted into a hospital. Testing procedures are improving and the hospital admissions come from positive tests.

Along with vaccines possibilities, drugs, treatments, and improvements in our medical response have dropped Atlanta’s mortality rate of hospitalizations in large systems is at 5%. Two months ago that rate was 20%.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

North Georgia Senior Living: What Does Ready Look Like?

Lifestyle
ready, quality

BKP and Jessi Barton start the conversation for you this week about being ready. Looking at the “next transition” in life, the discussion becomes not if, but when. A next transition is always on the horizon at any stage of life.

With no end in sight for the pandemic, today becomes the time for many as they begin to think that now is the time to act. People also say that transitioning into Senior Living is something they wish they hadn’t waited on.

Jessi Barton touches on increases in Life Expectancy for people in Senior Living. Tales come from developing relationships to having more interactions through events and community supports. Studies show support for the idea of community as a major influence in that area.

Fear and uncertainty can be barriers there, and it can create a divide as maybe families are ready, but the senior isn’t. Jassi explains that the important question to ask is, “What does ready look like?”

Some may not have answers. Some may not have thought about it. If we focus so hard on the ‘what ifs’ and horror stories unintentionally. That only creates stress and anxiety.

Focusing on the memories, processing through the sentimentality. People want the feeling of “home.”

It comes back to an old cliche that still holds firmly true today. “You make a home, a house is just a structure.”

 

Sponsored by Cameron Hall in Ellijay, you can follow more of North Georgia Senior Living through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

 

Ask The Doc! Clearing The Air

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

This morning, Dr. William Whaley and Raymond Tidman clear the air of the false Covid-19 information floating around. They discuss antibodies, how to protect yourself and others, and hotbeds for the virus.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask the Doc! Time to pivot and protect

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

Returning to in person, today’s Ask the Doc focuses on the numbers in Georgia, what’s different in different regions, and Dr. Tidman says it is time to pivot in our response to the virus and start looking at the protection of the few.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask the Doc! What are the odds?

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

On Ask the Doc this week, Dr. Ray Tidman and Dr. William Whaley discuss the odds for non-high-risk people’s chance of receiving the virus. Also is there a possibility of going to back to our normal lives as we knew them? or will there be a new normal?

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask the Doc! Flattening The Curve

Lifestyle
ask the doc

BKP asks Dr. William Whaley and Dr. Steven Marlow their prediction on this virus. They mentioned how you can slightly see with the prosecutions put out how the curve is flattening. It is very important, they state, that we continue doing those thing, such as sanitizing our hands, wearing masks and social distancing to continue with this curve flattening.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

North Georgia Senior Living: Social Distancing

Lifestyle
ready, quality

Jessi Barton of Cameron Hall discusses with BKP how they are handling social distancing in their facility. This includes keeping the seniors healthy, happy, and active while providing them that community piece that Cameron Hall is known for. Though social distancing may be hard, Jessi Barton insures that they are doing the best that they can and are accomplishing that.

Sponsored by Cameron Hall in Ellijay, you can follow more of North Georgia Senior Living through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask the Doc! Corona Virus and our special guest

Lifestyle
ask the doc

Doctor Steven Marlowe joins Doctor William Whaley to discuss all things Corona Virus. They compare COVID-19 to the Flu and answer the question, Are we overreacting?

Ask the Doc! Knee Replacements and the Corona Virus

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

Today on #AsktheDoc we discuss how to know when you need a knee replacement. We also touch on how to protect yourself from illnesses such as the corona virus.

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