Ask The Doc! College And Covid-19

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

This morning, the doctors discuss how colleges are dealing with Covid-19. When a Student tests positive, the colleges continue classes and give the infected student their own quarantined dorm. Is this the approach we should be taking with everything? Should we worry over the numbers? Hear Doctor Whaley and Doctor Tidman’s point of view on this right here on Ask the Doc!

 

Ask the Doc! The battle of information and experts

Lifestyle
ask the doc, virus, information

Going around the nation in photos and articles, BKP highlights the first day back to school with some of the issues and struggles that people are seeing. From packed hallways to sports cancellations, these are merely the effects of virus’ continuation.

The first step to returning to school is staying up to date on information. Your state’s Department of Public Health has that information in whatever form they are reporting in. But for families with students, whether you’re getting on a bus today, or getting on your laptop for school at home. Maintaining awareness and an informed study of your state’s situation will keep you up to date with the Docs, and up to date on your own choices in the coming days.

BKP starts our discussions off with comparisons of the available information from recent days as well as a comparison of age groups showing a vast increase of younger people (age 18-29). These people could be those ignoring guidelines and social distancing. But they also show one of the lower hospitalizations counts of all people over 18-years-old. They also have the lowest death rate of those groups.

Dr. William Whaley clarifies further saying there isn’t a lot of sick people there, just a lot of positive tests. A very important clarification as Dr. Whaley explains that study isolating people for 21 days with positive tests. That test showed 30 percent of those positive cases never showing a single symptom. The viral load of that 30 percent is just as high as those who do get sick. The contagion is still there and still spreading. Along with this point, Dr. Raymond Tidman offers another note saying a lot of our decision making points are not considering this as well.

The Doctors also look at the treatment guidelines and how much has change since March of 2020. Is the medical community really looking at Hydroxychloroquine and it’s uses? Who should be taking it? When is it viable? Who is approving the drug? These questions all surround these treatment guidelines. Who is supposed to tell you what is effective? Dr. Whaley talks about the steps of drug studies and the misinformation that gets people sidetracked or panicked?

Dr. Tidman agrees that it is difficult to filter these things and work towards a common understanding. People are so inundated with information, technology, sources, and videos. Dr. Tidman says to focus on results and what you know. Don’t let the internet and the vast amounts of information and misinformation jerk you around.

Looking through previous episodes, we talk about some of the predictions that came true in sports with games being cancelled and positive cases rising. Players are following old habits and not maintaining the new rules. Major League Baseball has already warned teams that failure to follow the new rules will see teams suspended for the season. Additionally, more and more players are opting out of their sports this year to avoid the risk. The NFL opt out saw 66 player saying they won’t play this year. According to Dr. Whaley, many of those players were the higher risk players, front lineman and high contact positions.

The changing game is a mirror of our society, according to Whaley. Just like the games, societal behavior will change as he suspects the virus will “smolder” in a form of presence for years. Not enough to be a pandemic, but enough to continue changing your behavior.

Because of that, Dr. Tidman counters with a point of saying that people don’t live like they are in a hospital. He points out that physicians tell people things that work and those that don’t. They can help people with finding acts that are troublesome and things that can help them. A doctor can put a patient in a controlled environment, teach them about an illness, show them how to eat and live and move, but people don’t live in controlled environments.

In that same way, there are many people saying exactly what to do and how to do it in the face of the virus. Verging on tyranny, people will not follow everything they are told to do. However, Dr. Tidman says that educating people and informing them on all the details and mitigation steps that will allow them to live their lives and live with the consequences of their lives.

Shifting topics, one decisions that some are wishing they could do is get the virus at home with the family and immunize to it naturally so that they can move on as normal. An idea rooted in the desire to just get past the issue after 5-6 months of this virus.

Circling back to the beginning thoughts, the question of viability in that idea is the same question of public health attempting to isolate and quarantine positive cases. The difference between being positive and being sick is pushing authorities on how to carry on normally.

Dr. Tidman also points all the way back to two cruise ships full of people. One of those ships got masks and used them to slow the spread. Dr. Tidman noted that even if they got infected, some of those people using masks got lower doses of the virus and became asymptomatic as their bodies were better and more quickly able to respond and build immunity to it. The “viral load,” as Dr. Whaley calls it, is important in those cases. That said, Dr. Tidman notes that some people need to avoid the virus. Higher risk people are higher risk because the could die from the virus. Those risks are too high.

The questions of need, risk, immunity, life, mitigation, and exposure all need to go through experts. Doctors who have seen the virus. But, ultimately, we as people make our own decisions. We choose what we do and how we respond. We grow in our lives through those decisions. The best we can do is find those experts who have the best information and avoid the misguidance that is overabundant.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

Ask The Doc! Killing The Fake News

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

How do you do what you want amid the virus? Dr. William Whaley talks everything from sports to travel for citizens and maintaining your responsibility.

First up is the masks. Dr. Whaley speaks to the efficacy of mask usage. He talks about using goggles and the suggestions of who should wear them. Face shields, masks, goggles and other protective equipment are exactly what doctors wore for AIDS, Hepatitis, and many other diseases to prevent splatter. Sure, goggles do lower chance to contract the Coronavirus by a small percentage and medical professionals need to wear these things.

BKP and Dr. Whaley make the analogy that in baseball, if someone cannot play, you can always call up a player from the minors or find a replacement, but healthcare professionals don’t have reserves of “players” waiting to be called up.

Dr. Ray Tidman speaks on the subject, too, as he points out that Dr. Whaley wouldn’t wear the shield and mask in the back office as he works, but does wear it in the hallways and with patients. He says, “I want to bring it out to clarify it to the public. I keep trying to emphasize that you need to wear the right mask at the right time and in the right place.”

Taking responsibility and knowing these times is part of the day. Dr. Tidman says to stop shaming and pointing fingers, but also wear the right gear when you need to.

Taking news is important in our age, but the Doctors warn you against some of the outlandish claims of media and certain tv and news doctors. Focusing on the information available is another responsibility in fighting the virus.

Dr. Whaley also speaks on the sports side and how athletes react to playing against empty stadiums as well as treatment for players. Players under contract play the game, but as soon as the player contracts the virus. He is a patient says Dr. Whaley. They have Doctors and the team should stay out of the care. It isn’t about the team and the game at that point. It’s about certainty and nobody knows if it is safe to play and work out at the high level of activity or how soon they should.

He compares the bubbles in NBA and NHL use as they play. The drastic difference in those play styles has shown to be efficient.

Both Doctors agree that it shouldn’t be an authority decision, but rather a group decision of those involved.

This also translates down to new rules, changes in operations and style in high school sports, specifically football right now.

Dr. Tidman also brings up the idea of rule-making amid the fear and reactionary process. This is where he says that the smaller groups of people could come together and make better policies and rules than far off authoritarians handing down those rules. In this way, they can see the information and consensus rather than responding to fear. The fear only causes overreactions and bad situations.

Moving away from the shame and fear is the final thought of Tidman as he points to us, as humans, figuring things out together instead of separating.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

 

Ask The Doc! The good progress in combating the virus

Lifestyle
ask the doc, virus, information

Ask the Doc takes a look at the opposite side of the line in combating the virus as so many are focusing on the negative.

Dr. William Whaley returns again this week to answer questions of those asking what, if anything, are we doing right about the fight against COVID-19. As always, the tie plays a role. This time, Dr. Whaley wears a tie with balls on it as he speaks to a recurring metaphor he uses.

Handling the virus is like juggling balls in the air as an assistant continually adds one more ball after one more ball.

Making progress against the virus and understanding each stage better has helped to stop adding balls to the juggling and is looking to start removing some of these”factors” and “complications” that can overwhelm a patient.

The next step in combating the virus and the overwhelming, as BKP says, is getting out the information for people to see the progress. BKP walks you through the Department of Public Health Website as Dr. Whaley explains some of the numbers and population comparisons.

With more information, we know a lot more about treatment, we know a lot more about the virus. Dr. Whaley talks about reacting to and treating to turn Cytokine Storms into healthy lungs.

According to the National Cancer Institute, a Cytokine Storm is “a severe immune reaction in which the body releases too many cytokines into the blood too quickly. Cytokines play an important role in normal immune responses, but having a large amount of them released in the body all at once can be harmful. A cytokine storm can occur as a result of an infection, autoimmune condition, or other disease. It may also occur after treatment with some types of immunotherapy. Signs and symptoms include high fever, inflammation (redness and swelling), and severe fatigue and nausea. Sometimes, a cytokine storm may be severe or life threatening and lead to multiple organ failure. Also called hypercytokinemia.”

Cytokine Storm Syndrome is the real threat of the virus as you are “juggling” issues. The syndrome is that major ball that causes everything to fall. Dr. Whaley explains how understanding the coagulation effects and counter the major issues of the syndrome can crater fatality rates.

Thanks to these steps and continuing efforts, Dr. Whaley says that we are lowering the fatality rates of those hospitalized. It is also lowering the number of people that a single positive person infects. He explains that getting an average rate of this below one person is how you can decrease, slow, and kill the disease. He points to efforts like masks and social distancing as just one part of the steps to lower that average.

We also reach into hospitalizations and how admissions aren’t coming from COVID-19 immediately. Dr. Whaley says that you might get tested, but a person has to be sick to be admitted into a hospital. Testing procedures are improving and the hospital admissions come from positive tests.

Along with vaccines possibilities, drugs, treatments, and improvements in our medical response have dropped Atlanta’s mortality rate of hospitalizations in large systems is at 5%. Two months ago that rate was 20%.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

Ask the Doc! The Science and Secondary Effects of Covid-19

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

With major spikes in numbers, Ask the Doc! talks about the daily science of treatment of the virus while translating and bringing the science of the virus to you.

Dr. William Whaley’s tie leads into a conversation about the international scope of the virus while comparing medical safety in countries. Which data is viable and what statistics are out of proportion? A 100% increase in deaths could mean going from 1 to 2. Whaley says to focus on people getting sick. So, what do you do about it?

Dr. Whaley also touches on lockdowns and shutdowns have on the spread of the virus as he compares case rates before shutdown and those after shutdowns in 149 countries. But also compares mask usage with a story about two hair stylists in Missouri. With positive tests on these two stylists after having served 139 clients and contact with 6 coworkers. Dr. Whaley said not one of those people tested positive.

Dr. Tidman speaks to schools reopening and the panic onset. Overreactions are hurting our country and people are not calmly assessing the situation. Returning to schools and providing safety for students is possible with scientists and doctors supporting the thought.

But taking into account a student and family together, BKP turns the conversation to sports seasons. Tidman responds with the muddled message of masks in the country. Which mask is the mask people need and who needs them? The Docs go deeper into masks and needs within the community.

As we continue figuring things out amid the virus, Dr. Tidman talks about the learning process and the requirement of discipline. Discipline is the second half of the freedom we own as we must take responsibility as we move into school, into Fall, and into the next steps of recovery.

 

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

 

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

Ask The Doc! Confused Facts

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

Walking you through the Coronavirus updates with the Department of Public Health, North Georgia’s surge, and the public’s concerns. With more cases daily, Dr. William Whaley and Dr. Ray Tidman speak with BKP on the virus and testing with Georgians from a medical standpoint and how we need to be looking at longer stretches of time with tests instead of singular days. We look at the graphs with statistical analysis of cases in Georgia with Dr. Whaley. However, Dr. Tidman counters with comparisons of urban Atlanta versus a more rural North Georgia while touching on Gilmer’s recent positive test in the courts.

Additionally, we breach the discussions of schools and education amid the virus. With the resurgence of the virus, is “home learning” really the best idea? Topics like wearing masks in schools and the precautions that schools are taking become part of the discussion as the compare schools allowing families who choose “home learning” while having others in school and others with less restrictions. Dr. Whaley says the decisions fall with the families instead of the school administrators.

Ultimately, we talk about the responsibility involved in the virus. Individual responsibilities reiterates what the Doctors have been saying. Protect yourself, don’t rely on others for your protection and the responsibility of your health.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

 

Ask The Doc! What We Now Know About Covid-19

Lifestyle
ask the doc

BKP finally has a mask! This morning, the doctors explain everything they didn’t know before revolving around Covid-19. ICU deaths have gone down. Did we open too soon? Have I already had the virus? All these questions and more answered on Ask the Doc!

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

North Georgia Senior Living: The Media’s Impact on Senior Living

Lifestyle
ready, quality

BKP and Jessie Barton discuss how the media has impacted the way people look at senior living. She explains the fear of waiting too long to go to the doctor.

Sponsored by Cameron Hall in Ellijay, you can follow more of North Georgia Senior Living through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask The Doc! Ratios and Better Masks

Lifestyle
ask the doc, virus, information

BKP is joined by Dr. William Whaley and Dr. Raymond Tidman to discuss the most recent medical news. Dr. Raymond Tidman asks for a better masks that don’t collect fluid throughout the day. The doctors also discuss the importance of putting out ratios.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask The Doc! Vaccines and a Second Wave

Lifestyle
ask the doc

BKP is joined by Dr. William Whaley and Dr. Raymond Tidman to discuss the concept of vaccines. Dr. Whaley says a vaccine wouldn’t be available until late December. They also discuss a second wave.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask The Doc! Attack Rate and The Asymptomatic Population

Lifestyle
ask the doc, virus, information

This morning #BKP is joined by Dr. Whaley and Dr. Tidman to discuss Covid-19 and the effectiveness of masks. Dr. Whaley also discusses the percentage of the population that is walking around with the virus and is unaware.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Local martial artist back to normal after stroke

Fetching Featured

GAINESVILLE, Ga. – Greg and Jeri Mansur were away for a little bit of a staycation when a stroke struck.

Greg was out buying some medicine for Jeri’s headache. They exchanged a few texts. But, when he returned to the hotel, he found Jeri, her face against the ground. “He came back, and he saw me on the floor,” Jeri, now 63, said.

She couldn’t stand. She couldn’t give her husband any answers. She wasn’t sure how she ended up on the floor and couldn’t figure out why she wasn’t able to get up. Greg knew something was wrong.

In the 11 minutes between the last text Greg exchanged with his wife and the time he called 911, Greg realized Jeri had suffered a stroke. He was able to tell the operator on the phone, and Jeri was taken to Northeast Georgia Medical Center (NGMC) in Gainesville, the area’s designated primary stroke center, for rapid treatment. The staff at NGMC were prepared for Jeri’s arrival and able to administer alteplase, a blood clot-busting drug. When a stroke occurs, time is everything.

“Her arm, her whole left side, was gone,” Greg said. “She had no movement, no feeling, no strength, no anything. She was looking the wrong way when I called her, and I said, ‘Baby, something’s wrong.’ So, I called 911 right away.”

Jeri is an otherwise healthy person. She’s likely healthier than most her age – or even younger. She’s a martial artist with a third-degree black belt and a personal trainer. Greg said she’s worked out at least five days a week, every week, since her 20s. She doesn’t have a history of strokes in her family.

“I would have never thought in a million years that I’d have a stroke,” Jeri said. “I’ve been healthy all my life.”

But a stroke can affect anybody. “That’s the scary thing about strokes,” said Holley Adams, stroke coordinator at NGMC Gainesville. “They can happen to anyone at any time. And, when a stroke does occur, it’s important to get help fast — like Greg was able to do for Jeri.”

When Jeri suffered her stroke in July 2019, she was rushed to NGMC. The quick assessment she received there helped save Jeri from any long-term deficits she may have faced.

“It’s important to always seek care immediately if you’re experiencing symptoms of a stroke, even during this COVID-19 pandemic,” Adams said. “The main thing we want everyone to do is call 911, no matter what. When you arrive at NGMC, we’re prepared to evaluate you quickly and administer alteplase if you’re eligible. And, if we need to send you somewhere else for further treatment, we’re prepared to do that, too.”

Before Greg was able to get to NGMC to be with his wife, nurses at the areas designated primary stroke center had a plan in place.

“By the time I got there, they had already figured out that Jeri had a clot in her brain, and she needed to get down to (Grady Memorial Hospital),” Greg said. “Their speediness in addressing the issue was certainly very good.”

Jeri was flown to Grady in Atlanta for surgery, and she is now almost fully recovered.

“I don’t have any paralysis,” Jeri said. “But what I’ve learned since the stroke is that time is of the essence.”

May is National Stroke Awareness Month, and this is Jeri’s first year observing as a stroke survivor. She didn’t know much about strokes around this time last year, but now she does.

“You could say he’s my hero,” Jeri said of her husband. “Because of the way he acted so quickly in getting me help, whenever I’m in a situation where somebody might be having a stroke, I’ll do my very best to do what he did for me — get help as quick as possible. I’m very thankful.”

For more information about stroke care and to learn how one of NGMC’s designated stroke centers in Barrow, Braselton or Gainesville can help, visit nghs.com/stroke-care.

 

ABOUT NORTHEAST GEORGIA MEDICAL CENTER

Since 1951, Northeast Georgia Medical Center (NGMC) has been on a mission of improving the health of our community in all we do. With hospitals located in Gainesville, Braselton, Winder and Dahlonega, the four NGMC campuses have a total of more than 700 beds and more than 1,100 medical staff members representing more than 50 specialties. NGMC is part of Northeast Georgia Health System, a non-profit that cares for more than 1 million people across more than 18 counties. Learn more at www.nghs.com.

 

 

 

Ask the Doc! Changing the goal posts and what to believe

Lifestyle
ask the doc, virus, information

Special Host Rick speaks with Dr. William Whaley about the CDC, Masks, and what goals we’re still trying to reach to reopen and reconnect amid the virus. Should we be wearing them? Will there be a vaccine? What about the surfaces? The doctor ansers viral questions about what you should know and prepare with for the outbreak.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask The Doc! Clearing The Air

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

This morning, Dr. William Whaley and Raymond Tidman clear the air of the false Covid-19 information floating around. They discuss antibodies, how to protect yourself and others, and hotbeds for the virus.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

School Nurse Day

Featured Stories

On May 6, 2020, we will recognize our school nurses by celebrating National School Nurse Day
to foster a better understanding of the role of school nurses have in the educational setting.
The theme this year is School Nurses: Supporting Students in Times of Crisis.

This year has been more challenging for everyone in the world with the COVID-19 global
pandemic. Pickens County School District (PCSD) has a licensed school nurse in every building
and whether they are working in the school clinic or working virtually, they take on a variety of
roles, duties, and responsibilities with the intent to promote academic and lifelong achievement.
For many children, the school nurse may be the only health professional they have access to
regularly. This becomes even more important as the prevalence of chronic social, emotional,
and other health problems keep increasing. Their role is essential for all students — in public
health, in care coordination, in organizing access to resources to help address the social
determinants of health, and in policy development, particularly to support the health and
education of our students during this pandemic.

Thank you, Pickens County School District nurses, for leading health promotion and disease
prevention in our school community. You have helped decrease fears and promote the
prevention of COVID-19, the flu, and other illnesses. You continue to educate and support
students, parents, and school staff virtually. You are volunteering with food distribution,
providing facial coverings, assisting the Department of Public Health with contact tracing, and
modifying end-of-year processes considering the pandemic.

Our elected officials and school leaders have invested in programs and services that improve
the health and well-being outcomes of all children. The school nurses could not do the job they
do without the support and investment of community stakeholders including PCSD Board of
Education members, district and school leaders, and many others. “Thank You” to everyone
who supports school nurses ensuring our children have a successful, productive, and healthy
future.

Ask the Doc! Airspace particles and the virus

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

Dr. William Whaley and Dr. Ray Tidmon are back at Circuit World with BKP! They talk about air space particles and testing. There are only three types of people that need to be tested per Dr. Tidman. Those people being “sick, healthcare providers, and those people who are taking care of the at-risk”.

Sponsored by North Georgia Cancer Research Specialists, affiliated with Northside Hospital, you can follow more on Ask the Doc! through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Back to Top