Pet Of The Week! TinkerBell

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This week’s star of the show is the lovely Tinkerbell! Tink is a roughly 13 week old puppy in need of a loving home. She has two siblings also located at the Humane Society Of Blue Ridge. Rena says she will most likely be a medium to large dog. Tink is currently up for foster to adopt as well as her two siblings. She is extremely sweet and ready to find her forever home. If you’re looking to adopt an animal check out the humane society and all of their furry friends!

 

Homeward Bound, Jack

Fast & Furriest

Meet Jack, a 14 year old Jack Russell terrier with the heart and mind of a pup half his age.  This little guy weighs 17 ½ lbs.  Jack is good on a leash; house trained; and at this time, is confused as to why he is in a kennel.  He was in a home where he was loved his whole life but his dad passed away and the family didn’t want him.  Jack’s adoption fee is $90.  He is current on all vaccinations and neutered.

Jack is located at Homeward Bound Pet Rescue in Blue Ridge, GA.

Apply online:  www.hbpr.org

 

Homeward Bound Pet Rescue, Layla

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What you will notice first about Layla is her dazzling smile! Then you really take
notice of her beautiful brindle coat and top that with a sweet personality. Layla is
a 35 lb., active 6 + year old terrier mix. She loves to play; snuggle; take leash
walks and enjoys being co-pilot in the car! Sound like your kind of girl?

Layla is located at Homeward Bound Pet Rescue in Blue Ridge, GA.

Apply online: www.hbpr.org

Pet Of The Week! Katrina

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Pet of the Week, dog, puppy, Katrina,

A big girl, Katrina is about four years old according to Rena. At 67 pounds, she is one of our bigger Pets of the Week.

Rena says that she didn’t have a lot of human interaction when they got her, but the people of the Blue Ridge Humane Society have worked with her to make Katrina a good dog.

However, cats are still a problem as she doesn’t like them, so cat-friendly houses are probably not the best for her. In fact, Katrina wants to be the only dog or cat in the house so that she can be lazy and loving with you.

Very gentle and fine to hang outside, she is flexible in your day’s schedule as she likes laying on the couch. She also likes to alert you to anything unusual or strange sounds. Rena says she could be a good watchdog.

But mostly, Katrina wants a companion. And in turn she can become a perfect companion for you or your family as she needs a forever home and a family who can love her as much as she loves them.

You can schedule a time to meet with Katrina this week. So, start the process online at the Humane Society of Blue Ridge or call them at 706-632-4357 to set up a time to meet with him, or schedule a meet and greet for your pets to see how they get along.

Sponsored by Blue Ridge Humane Society, you can follow more on Pet of the Week through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

 

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

Pet of The Week! Bear

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Pet of the Week, dog, puppy, Katrina,

This week, FYNTV says hello to Bear! A brand new Pet of the Week, Bear is between seven and eight weeks old, but much of his history and details are not so certain.

Bear may have honey in his heart, but his tale isn’t so sweet. Rena tells us that they are having to guess a lot with the dog as he was picked up from another county after being found in a garbage can. Despite the sad beginnings, Rena says that this is exactly why they are around. People should always find a humane society or animal shelter of some kind, never dump a pet like this.

Now, Bear lives at the Humane Society of Blue Ridge where he has found better conditions. Bear likes to sit in the cool of the shade, constantly avoiding the sun. He is still skittish against loud noises and needs a little more attention for training as most puppies do.

However, Bear likes cats!

We also have finally gotten BKP to get a cat. A long time Dog-enthusiast, even he is branching out to provide a better home for animals in the area.

You can schedule a time to meet with Bear this week. So, start the process online at the Humane Society of Blue Ridge or call them at 706-632-4357 to set up a time to meet with him, or schedule a meet and greet for your pets to see how they get along.

Sponsored by Blue Ridge Humane Society, you can follow more on Pet of the Week through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

 

 

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

Pet Of The Week – Happy!

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Pet of the Week, dog, puppy, Katrina,

Seven puppies have come to the Blue Ridge Humane Society for adoption, but only Happy came to FYNTV today to be the Pet of the Week on our Friday show.

All seven puppies are named after the seven dwarves.

Happy, a female, along with her two brothers, Sneezy and Sleepy, are the only three left without pre-adoptions pending. Roughly 9-10 weeks old, the Pet of the Week segment is one of Happy’s first outings as she explores the world.

She is ready for her foster-to-adopt process to come home with you until the full process completes with spay. Rena said she is partly a Chihuahua mix, meaning she will not grow large.

You can start the process online at the Humane Society of Blue Ridge or call them at 706-632-4357 to set up a time to meet with Happy or her brothers along with meet and greets for your pets to see how they get along.

Sponsored by Blue Ridge Humane Society, you can follow more on Pet of the Week through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

If you’re enjoying the Sunday Edition, then consider becoming a contributor with your own articles. If you have an article that needs highlighting send it to lonnie@fetchyournews.com to become a part of our growing community of feature news.

Pet Of The Week: Nikko!

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Pet of the Week, dog, puppy, Katrina,

This week, We are joined once again by Nikko. Nikko is a 3 year old bundle of love, energy, and strength. He needs to be the only dog in a family,but will love you enough for 3. He loves walks, car rides, and giving kisses. Nikko has been at the shelter too long make an appointment to see him today!

Sponsored by Blue Ridge Humane Society, you can follow more on Pet of the Week through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Protect your family, pets and yourself against rabies

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rabies

GAINESVILLE, GA – Although the occurrence of rabies among humans has declined noticeably over the years, the disease continues among wild animals. Encounters between wild animals and domestic pets, including some that involve people, sometimes occur in our area. These incidents of exposure are common but can be prevented if residents take precautions to protect themselves and their pets.  People should always avoid contact with unfamiliar dogs, cats, and wild animals. This includes feeding or attempting to help an animal that appears injured. Maintaining current rabies vaccinations for your pets and keeping them away from wild animals is the best way to protect them.  If you feed your pets outside, pick up any uneaten food so wild animals, including feral cats, will not be attracted to your property. Feral cats, unlike stray domesticated cats, are born in the wild and should be treated as wild animals.  Do not attempt to capture or feed feral or stray cats. Leave them and other wild animals alone.

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources has rigid regulations that prohibit the keeping of wild and wild/domestic hybrid animals as pets. Some animals identified by these regulations are raccoons, skunks, coyotes, foxes, and bats; which also are common carriers of rabies. More information is available about wild animals on the DNR website http://www.georgiawildlife.com.  If you see a wild animal acting strangely, avoid the animal and contact the DNR Ranger Hotline at 1-800-241-4113.

Rabies is a viral infection transmitted in the saliva of infected mammals. The virus enters the central nervous system of the host causing an inflammation of the brain that is almost always fatal. The most common virus carriers in the United States are raccoons, skunks, coyotes, foxes, and bats. Wildlife remains the most likely potential source of infection for both humans and domestic animals in the United States. Rabies is transmitted only when the virus is introduced into bite wounds, open cuts in the skin, or onto mucous membranes, such as the eyes or mouth.  Rabies in humans can be prevented by eliminating exposures to rabid animals or by providing exposed persons prompt medical treatment. Post-exposure rabies treatment includes a series of vaccine injections.  The treatment can be costly; however, it is extremely important because rabies is almost always fatal without it.  Post-exposure vaccine can be found at all the major hospitals within District 2 and information about vaccine assistance programs can be obtained from your local Environmental Health Office.

Public health officials become involved in animal cases where exposure or potential exposure to rabies occurs. The role of public health is to ensure that domestic animals are vaccinated against rabies and to ensure the public is informed about rabies risks and the need to seek medical treatment.

There is no better time than now to ensure that all your pets are currently vaccinated.  For more information about rabies, ask your veterinarian, local health department or go to http://dph.georgia.gov/rabies.

World Rabies Day is September 28 for more information visit the CDC. Feature image from the CDC.

Homeward Bound Pet Rescue Pet of the Week – Lucky

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Frisbee, anyone? If you are looking for a Frisbee partner, Lucky is your kind of
guy!

He is also a good walker, couch potato and just a good dog to have as your best
friend. Lucky is 7 years old and 25 lbs. He is totally vetted and ready for his
forever home.

Lucky is located at Homeward Bound Pet Rescue in Blue Ridge. Please contact us
for an appointment. Apply online: www.hbpr.org

Pet Of The Week! Ariel

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Pet of the Week, dog, puppy, Katrina,

This week we are joined by the playful, social Ariel! Ariel is about 9-10 months old and was returned for chewing. Ariel is a social loving dog looking for her forever home.

Sponsored by Blue Ridge Humane Society, you can follow more on Pet of the Week through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Ask Alex : I Want A Dog

Lifestyle
Advice, Ask, Alex, Behavior, Opinion, relationship, girlfriend, boyfriend, exes, photos, pictures, commitment, compromise

Hey Alex! 

I have wanted a dog for as long as I can remember! I constantly search rescue websites looking for that perfect companion. When I was younger I always lived in apartments that wouldn’t allow pets, but now I own my own house, with my husband…. Therein lies my problem. He is just not a dog person and won’t budge on not wanting a dog in the house. Recently, I found a little guy that I think would be perfect for us, but I keep getting a very stern no from my other half.

What should I do? Would it be horrible if I just adopted the dog anyway? I’ve always heard it’s better to ask forgiveness than to get permission.

Sincerely,
Needing A Pup

 

Hey Needing A Pup!

I’m going to go ahead and stop you in your tracks. In this situation it is absolutely NOT better to ask for forgiveness than to get permission. Adopting a pet is a huge commitment in all aspects of your life. It will change how you operate day-to-day. It will change if you and when you can plan vacations and events. Not to mention the financial responsibility that comes with being a pet owner and these are just the practical areas that will be impacted, not the emotional impacts that would come and probably trouble your marriage.

Adopting a pet is a lifetime commitment for that pet. What would you do if your husband is so angry he says it’s me or the dog? Would you just give up on the dog? What if this moment comes down the road when you have had time to bond with your pet? Would you be able to take him or her back to the shelter?

It sounds like your husband has been very clear on his feelings about getting a dog from go, which means you still chose to be with him knowing that you might never be able to own your own dog. 

I would recommend that you take time to volunteer at a shelter and try to get your puppy fix without bringing one home.  Another possibility that you could speak with your husband about is fostering. 

Rescues are always looking for foster homes, and the thought of the dog only being at your house temporarily might be something that your husband would be down to do. If fostering goes well he might just change his mind and be open to adopting a permanent four legged family member.

Sincerely,
Alex

 

 

You can check out more of Alex’s advice by clicking here : Ask Alex : Where to Eat?

https://sundayedition.fetchyournews.com/2020/06/07/ask-alex-where-to-eat/

 

If you enjoy reading Alex’s advice, send in your questions or situations to AskAlex@fetchyournews.com. Each week, Alex will answer a new question or provide some friendly advice on issues we deal with every day. Whether it’s serious, fun, interesting, or you’re just stuck, send in your questions to Ask Alex for a little bit of outside perspective on life.

Pet Of The Week! Katrina

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Pet of the Week, dog, puppy, Katrina,

This Week we have Katrina on the show. Katrina is a three-year-old rescue. She’s extremely calm and sweet. She isn’t a fan of puppies or cats, some adult dogs would be okay. Help us Find Katrina her forever home.

Sponsored by Blue Ridge Humane Society, you can follow more on Pet of the Week through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Homeward Bound Pet Rescue – Pet of the week Olivia!

Fast & Furriest, Featured Stories

Homeward Bound Pet Rescue, Inc’s mission is to find safe, loving homes for unwanted pets in
the North Georgia area. Homeward Bound has re-homed over 7000 pets since 2000. We are a
100% non-profit, no kill organization that is completely run by volunteers and depend on
donations, grants, Paws and Claws Thrift Store and fundraising events during the year.

Homeward Bound Pet Rescue, Inc.

P.O. Box 792
Ellijay, GA 30540
706-698-HOME (4663)
Apply on line: www.hbpr.org
LIKE us on FaceBook

If you’re looking for a dog who loves to hug and be affectionate, you must meet Olivia, a 55#, 3
year-old (we really never know for sure) hound dog. Olivia is HW+ and is currently being
treated for the next several months. At this time, she will require a quiet atmosphere; no rough
play; only leisurely walks. Olivia walks great on a leash. She just wants to be close. HBPR
covers all meds and treatment. Protocol can be transferred to another vet if out of the Gilmer
area.

We’d also love to tell you about volunteering, fostering and adoption opportunities.
Homeward Bound pets are up to date on vaccinations, treated month for fleas, ticks and heart
worms, spayed or neutered and are ready for adoption unless specified otherwise.
We are available for a “meet and greet” by appointment. The address is: 215 Wishon Drive,
Blue Ridge, GA (off Maxwell Road). We do recommend bringing everyone who will be involved
with the new pet; especially your dog(s).

Thank you for your support! We couldn’t survive without the help from our friends!

Fetching Features: National Adopt a Shelter Pet Day

Fetching Featured
pet

April 30 is not a well known day. It passes by like so many, people unaware of the significance. Even I was unaware until this year. One of the fun parts of the Sunday Edition is learning things from the weekly “Are you Aware” column, and as it is, sort of, Pet Month, let me share a little love for our pets.

Animal shelters require dedicated volunteers and staff. Aid and adoption is a part of that system. Animals come in daily but shelters don’t always see adoptions daily. Caring for those animals is a temporary arrangement, but it is all in service to finding a “forever home.”

Hosting this special day is an attempt to raise awareness, but it also encourages you to visit a shelter and find your new “fur baby.” Owning a pet is a major deal. Maybe your mom or dad explained this when you were younger and you got the whole, “You’re going to have to clean up after it, feed it, bathe it, etc.” Maybe you didn’t get that. That could have been just me.

Let’s examine this phrase, “Fur-babies.” It’s a fun little title that adds a little light-heartedness to owning a pet. But for some, it’s so much more telling about their answer to a highly personal issue.

petSpeaking with a certain family, the very touchy subject arises and a truth is shared that they cannot have kids. This is a very serious issue that more people than you think deal with. Some may go through medical treatments, adjustments, adoption, foster homes. There is a myriad of choices and alternatives, though some may not get results from many of those options. This particular family decided not to even try them. Instead, they focus their attention on a substitute, a dog. A “fur-baby.”

It’s great to see a family share their life with an animal. It’s not the exact same thing as a child, but they make it work. Their dog is not only there to be playful and be a companion. But it fills a gap in their life, addresses a need to nurture something. They share their love and connect deeply with this animal in such a meaningful relationship that they have. Lines start to blur and the parent-child relationship with an animal growing deeper across years, on to a decade seems not only feasible but healthy in this environment.

My personal family, we have a dog and two cats. I love my dog, she is high energy and requires a lot of attention and maintenance. Just like that family, I get and give so much in this connection. Teaching her tricks and commands gives me a sense of accomplishment and goals in her training. Each time she learns and grows, it rebounds back that I have grown a bit. Teaching something to anyone or anything is a marvelous feeling.

petLike hunters who rely on their dogs in the hunt, travelers in the snow using sled-dogs for transportation, or emergency services utilize search and rescue dogs, there is a connection between a person and the pet they put time and effort into training. Don’t believe me? Then ask police who work alongside k-9 units, ask military who use sniffer dogs and similar activities.

Am I at their level? No. But, I use the example because I have felt something in my relationship with my dog that I can’t quite describe. Is it simply pride? Something different? I can only point to popular examples and say, “It’s sort of similar.”

Also, my dog provides a service to me. It’s not just about taking care of something small, teaching it, raising it, helping it to grow. It’s also about what I get in return.

I have had bad days just as you have. Those absolutely horrible, anger-fueled days that reach beyond irritated and go full-blown explosive rage. We all know them.

Let’s play to the stereotypes a moment and think about a six-foot-tall 280-pound, muscle-bound action hero in the movies. From the more recent movie “My Spy” all the way back to Arnold Schwarzenegger’s “Kindergarten Cop,” the hard-nosed guy meets a young girl who teaches him that there is a soft spot in all of us. Makes for great action-comedy movies, or at least popular ones.

That is exactly what I get on these days from 15 pounds of chaos. Amid these awful days, my dog provides a service. She is a creature that doesn’t care what happened, doesn’t care how angry I am. She doesn’t care that I am cursing about one thing or another.

The only thing she seems to care about is when I finally sit down so she can get in my lap. Yeah, I’m a pushover. What of it?

Only 15 pounds, that’s the entire difference between an awful day and a good night.

For some, it’s the only difference between managing and failing, depression and coping, or even life and death. Support animals are an amazing partnership from guide-dogs to emotional support animals, it seems like I’m constantly reading articles online about an animal who helps there person through a panic attack, or a trained support animal sensing seizures and warning their owner about an oncoming attack. The medical applications of an animal partnership are astounding. Even those with medical needs benefit physically from animal companions.

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), they can increase opportunities to exercise, get outside, and socialize. Regular walking or playing with pets can decrease blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and triglyceride levels. All of that on top of managing loneliness and depression by giving us companionship.

Studies have shown that the bond between people and their pets can increase fitness, lower stress, and bring happiness to their owners. Some of the health benefits of having a pet include decreased blood pressure, decreased cholesterol levels, decreased triglyceride levels, decreased feelings of loneliness, increased opportunities for exercise and outdoor activities, increased opportunities for socialization.

petIt’s not all dogs either. As I said, my family has two cats. Far more independent than the dog, these pets need just as much responsibility and care, but for someone who has to work a lot, or has work hours that change frequently, these animals are the perfect blend of attention while you’re there, and independence and self-care when you’re not.

On some of the lazy days, just sitting with family, watching tv, or relaxing on the couch, a little repetitive petting immediately sets me into a calming mode.

Ultimately, a pet is more than just an animal. Getting a pet is more than just a commitment. Building that relationship is more than just a friend you visit with. The daily bonding, exchange, and growth is an experience all its own. Celebrating a small day like this is no big event, but taking a moment to think about animals who don’t have that home they seek, or even just offering to help those who help them seek it, could be enough to make it worth the day of awareness. It’s all in how you, specifically, respond.

 

(All photos were provided by the Humane Society of Blue Ridge.)

Pet of the Week – Nikko and Adopting during the shutdown

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Pet of the Week, dog, puppy, Katrina,

Rena talks about the commitment of people who have adopted pets during the shutdown, concerns over possibly returning pets, and the best parts of Nikko, this week’s pet of the week.

Sponsored by Blue Ridge Humane Society, you can follow more on Pet of the Week through the dedicated playlist on FYNTV’s Youtube channel and check out a wider variety of shows there as well.

Sanctuary dog mourns his animal friends by staying by their side

Fast & Furriest

(story by Christian Cotroneo)

The horses, llamas, donkeys and dogs who arrive at Horse Creek Stable Rescue Sanctuary are often sick, battered or just plain tired.

Lester Aradi, a retired police chief, along with his wife Diane, makes sure no one lets them down again.

The refuge for special needs animals they founded in Georgia’s Blue Ridge mountains is a bustling 35-acre beacon of new beginnings.

But there are endings here, too.

When they pass, the animals are buried on a slight hillside overlooking the pastures. Graves for dogs are lined up in a row. Burials for bigger animals — horses, llamas, alpacas — are marked with a fruit tree. Lester and Diane see it as a symbol of the circle of life.

“We just try to honor them that way,” Lester tells MNN.

This week, Tricycle mourned the loss of his friend, an alpaca named Vixen. (Photo: Horse Creek Stable Rescue Sanctuary)

But the most obvious marker for a fresh grave will be a 3-legged golden retriever named Tricycle. When an animal dies, he mourns them — sometimes for as long as three days — by stretching across the grave.

Recently, he’s been spending his time at Vixen’s grave.

“We lost Vixen,” Aradi explains to MNN. “She was an older girl. An alpaca. Within an hour of her dying, we had a neighbor come with a backhoe and dug the grave.”

They planted the customary fruit tree.

Not long after that, Lester went out to feed the llamas. He gazed towards the hillside and, sure enough, “there’s Tricycle laying on Vixen’s grave.”

“I don’t know if he can sense it, smell it, or whatever, But I think he was grieving. That was his way of saying goodbye.”

And Tricycle has said it many times before. The first time was back when his friend Major died. A St. Bernard-mastiff mix, Major arrived at the farm nearly broken.

“He was brought here with back issues. He was abused. He couldn’t walk any more.”

Tricycle and Major became fast friends.

“When Major died, we buried him here on the farm,” Lester says. “Tricycle went over and laid on his grave for about three days. He would come into the house. But every time he was outside, he would go to his grave and lay on it.”

Lester and Diane Aradi have given countless animals a second chance in life, including Carrie the alpaca. (Photo: Horse Creek Stable Rescue Sanctuary)

Lester and Diane Aradi have given countless animals a second chance in life, including Carrie the alpaca. (Photo: Horse Creek Stable Rescue Sanctuary)

Lester posted a picture of Tricycle mourning Major on Horse Creek Stable’s Facebook page back in 2017. Not long after that, a dog rescue group got in touch with him. They loved the photo. They thought maybe Lester and Diane could take in another three-legged dog who could really use a second chance in life.

And so, Romeo arrived at the farm. Naturally, Tricycle bonded with his new friend — a golden retriever just like him.

Circle of life, indeed.

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